Historical Timeline

Did You Know?

  • The International Baccalaureate provides an enriched curriculum that both covers and extends beyond regular Saskatchewan curricula in its depth and detail. It emphasizes the development of the necessary critical skills that university-bound students need to master: reflecting, inquiring, thinking, analyzing and evaluating.

  • The Tuck Shop for snacks was at the bottom of the south stairs going to what is now the cafeteria. The legendary beans in a cone were considered a healthier & cheaper alternative to what students purchased across the street at the Aintree.

  • The choral tradition at Luther began in 1914. In addition to in-school performances, the choir has shared its ministry of music with many congregations across Canada and has performed regularly on local and national radio and television shows, at contests and festivals.

  • Luther graduates have gone on to universities such as Harvard, Oxford, Pennsylvania State, McGill, Queen’s and other renowned educational institutions throughout Canada, North America and the world.

  • When the College was first looking to relocate from Melville to Regina, it considered land at College & Winnipeg, College & Broad, and 23rd & Albert, finally settling on 18 acres of land on the west end of property owned by Government House, now called Royal Street.

  • Did you know there is a 3rd floor to the boy's dorm? It was traditionally assigned to upper level students who were more mature & responsible. Students who lived up there in the 1940’s confessed, in hushed tones, to having a radio when those devices were against school policy.

  • The first LIT was held on January 31, 1953. That year it was a one-day tournament involving sixteen teams from Southern Saskatchewan. All preliminary games were played cross court, two games at a time.

  • The first annual Senior Girls Volleyball Tournament was held in 1998 and is still going strong today!

Luther College Historical Timeline

Founding Principles

As a university professor, Martin Luther valued education. While the Lutheran church always insisted on the education of its clergy, Luther felt that education was important for all people. It was his hope that through education, each person would be able to serve God more fully in all aspects of life. Lutheran settlers around Melville, Saskatchewan were inspired by Luther's principles for education. Existing schools in Saskatchewan were few and far between and did not adequately prepare students for university. The Lutheran Church also needed educated ministers and teachers in Western Canada. These needs motivated the settlers to set up a Christian school. Luther Academy was established to provide high-quality education in a Christian context.

Follow the growth of Luther College's High School and University campuses from 1910 to the present day and share in a significant slice of Saskatchewan history.