1940's

Did You Know?

  • Luther students, even though from diverse social and cultural backgrounds, have the opportunity to be part of tightly woven community of students, parents, alumni, teachers and staff. Typically 12% of the school’s student body originates from outside of Canada.

  • Did you know there is a 3rd floor to the boy's dorm? It was traditionally assigned to upper level students who were more mature & responsible. Students who lived up there in the 1940’s confessed, in hushed tones, to having a radio when those devices were against school policy.

  • In the late 1920's, during an in-house baseball tournament, Rex Schneider entered a team called "Prof Schneider's Battling Lions." This is the first hint that someday Luther teams would be known as the Lions.  

  • The choral tradition at Luther began in 1914. In addition to in-school performances, the choir has shared its ministry of music with many congregations across Canada and has performed regularly on local and national radio and television shows, at contests and festivals.

  • The gym officially opened July 8, 1951. The Sunday afternoon celebration, attended by 1,500 people, featured speeches followed by an evening celebration with another 1,500 people in attendance to hear the Luther Choir and the RCMP Band.

  • Luther College High School is recognized as one of the four best university preparatory schools in western Canada with as many as 96% of Luther graduates pursuing post-secondary educations. 

  • The International Baccalaureate provides an enriched curriculum that both covers and extends beyond regular Saskatchewan curricula in its depth and detail. It emphasizes the development of the necessary critical skills that university-bound students need to master: reflecting, inquiring, thinking, analyzing and evaluating.

  • Do you know someone in Kindergarten to Grade 8 that would like to be part of the Luther Family? Encourage them to join the Future Luther Student program!

1939-45 – The first Regina boy killed in the Second World War, Peter Lay, is a Luther alumnus. He dies in a flight training accident.

In a strong display of patriotism, the boys’ dorm is run according to military procedures. Luther teachers organize Air Cadet Squadron No. 32 for high school boys, while senior and university students enroll in OTC, which is in cooperation with Regina College. Girls canvass door-to-door to raise money for the war effort, and learn supporting roles, such as signaling. Every morning a colour guard marches from the front door out to Royal Street to raise the flag and there is a sunset ceremony every evening as the flag is taken down.

During the war, over 300 Luther students and alumni are in the military service; sixteen do not return home, including James C. Black (1937), W. Martin Chambers (1936), Maurice G. Church (1936), Hubert U. Ford (1940), Dennis B. Froud (1937), Harry O. Fysh (1939), J. Edwin Gardiner (1934), Cecil D. Heming (1939), Peter C.E. Lay (1933), William McCausland (1931), Archibald S. McTavish (1934), Gordon A. Pearce (1938), Richard A. Scott (1937), R. Burns Scott (1940), Ronald A. Seaker (1936) and Kenneth Spring (1936).

Luther alumni, who were fluent in German, are often assigned as guards in the German POW camps established around Saskatchewan.

1945-1950 – Enrollment continues to increase during the war years and grows rapidly to 226 when the war is over.

Rex Schneider is the founding President of Canadian Lutheran World Relief, established to help postwar Europe including assistance to refugees coming to North America. A number of students from Germany find their way to Luther College.

Rex Schneider takes initiative in getting the various Lutheran churches of western Canada, representing different ethnic and theological traditions, to agree on supporting the seminary in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. His efforts result in Luther grads no longer needing to go to the United States to attend the seminary.