Winter/Spring 2017

Did You Know?

  • Luther College opened the first residence on campus in 1971, and is still a “home away from home” to students: meals, laundry, and lifelong friendship included.

  • Luther students can register in Arts, Science, or Media, Art, and Performance degree programs. All degrees are awarded by the U of R.

  • All programs at Luther College offer study abroad opportunities. As an affiliate of the U of R, we have partnerships with 450 universities across 70 different countries.

  • ALL U of R students including Luther students can take Luther courses.

  • Luther College at the University of Regina participates in Admission on the Spot events - campus tours, reduced application fees, and the relief of finding out you're accepted to your program right away!

  • It pays to go to Luther College. Literally. Luther students are eligible for an additional $100,000 in scholarships, in addition to all of the awards available to them as U of R!

  • The Luther College Residence is a great place for student athletes; it’s conveniently located and comes with a great meal plan.

  • Luther College students pay the same tuition and fees as other University of Regina students.

Winter/Spring 2017


By Barbara M. Reul, Editor 

It’s time for another issue of Impetus! Luther College is a liberal arts college rooted in Christian spirituality and a partner in post-secondary education with the University of Regina (LCUR).  Five key principles inform our teaching and research in the arts, fine arts, and sciences at Luther College: commitment to global citizenship; engagement in social justice; pursuit of a sustainable environment; demonstration of high ethical standards; and continuous reflection on values.

I invite you to view Luther College’s key principles with me through the lens of the Reformation in this issue, as Lutherans unite with other Christians around the world to commemorate the 500th anniversary of events that took place on October 31, 1517 in Wittenberg, Germany. Thanks to LCUR’s namesake, Martin Luther (1483–1546), a courageous and outspoken Catholic monk and respected academic, and his Ninety-Five Theses, the confessional landscape of 16th-century Germany changed forever.

What happened in 1517 – and can Luther’s impact still be felt today (see Figure 1)? Figure 1: Globe on the Wittenberg Market Square, Germany (photo credit: Barbara M. Reul, 4/2017)

We hope you will enjoy the following five articles related to issues surrounding the Reformation. Three are based on Table Talk lectures presented by Dr. Yvonne Petry, Drs. Meredith and Carl Cherland, and Dr. F. Volker Greifenhagen on the occasion of our very successful Table Talks Speaker Series at LCUR in February and March 2017. (If you couldn’t attend, no worries: we made videos of each for you to enjoy in perpetuity!). In the fourth article, Dr. William Stahl, retired professor of sociology at LCUR, investigates the one thing that, in his opinion, the Reformation did not change. Finally, the article by Dr. Mary Vetter, former academic dean at LCUR and soon to be retired Professor of Biology, brings us back into the present. She reports on an interdisciplinary class that was team-taught at LCUR in the Winter 2017 semester.

And in case you are wondering: here is an overview of the “Reformation 500” activities at LCUR in 2017; please join us whenever and however you can!

This is my fourth and last issue as the editor of Impetus. Thank you to everyone who contributed this time around, especially the authors. I am also grateful to LCUR’s Michelle Clark (Manager of Alumni Relations, Development & Communications and Editor of the Luther Story) and, in particular, Amber Peters (Alumni Relations, Development & Communications Assistant): walking in the footsteps of 16th-century visual artist Lucas Cranach, the Elder, and the inventor of the printing press, Johannes Gutenberg, she makes us all look great online. Thank you, or as we say in German: “Vergelt’s Gott” (lit. “May God reward [you for] it”)!