Upcoming Semester

Did You Know?

  • Luther College welcomes students of all faiths, ethnicities, backgrounds, religions, genders, and sexual orientation.

  • Luther College students pay the same tuition and fees as other University of Regina students.

  • Luther College offers the best of both worlds: a smaller college environment with all the benefits of a larger university.

  • Luther students can register in Arts, Science, or Media, Art, and Performance degree programs. Luther students are U of R students and receive a U of R degree.

  • The Luther College Residence is a great place for student athletes; it’s conveniently located and comes with a great meal plan.

  • Luther College offers year-round campus and residence tours as well as one-on-one enrollment counselling.

  • The Luther College Residence hosts multiple social events and programs throughout the year, such as Christmas Dinner, International Night, Mardi Gras, and Karaoke Night.

  • Luther students can sign up for the UR Guarantee program - get a guaranteed job after you graduate!

Upcoming Semester Luther Courses

Art & Art History
CRN10071
ListingART 290AC-L01
CourseIntroduction to Graphic Design
InstructorAnnalisa Raho
Time
Days

Graphic design surrounds everyone’s life, and we are exposed to a diverse range of messages through various media. But, what rules do the designers follow? How do they strategize their projects to guide the viewer’s perception? Through a combination of studio projects and lectures, you will explore principles of visual strategies and perception applied to design composition. By actively engaging with sketches, models, and outlines of existing projects, we will explore fundamental elements of the design composition such as alignment, proportion visual weight, and color. Furthermore, we will design new projects as they were realized in a professional environment.

CRN10113
ListingARTH 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Art History
Instructor
Time
Days

A survey of visual culture from prehistoric times to the present.

CRN10116
ListingARTH 324-L01
CourseCanadian Art
Instructor
Time
Days

Art in Canada from the colonial period to the present. Students will be introduced to issues of culture, ethnicity and gender, in relation to the Canadian context.

Biology
CRN10168
ListingBIOL 140-L01
CourseBiology I
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time
Days

This course surveys basic principles of biology at an introductory level using examples from humans and their environment. One goal of the course is to introduce the methods of science, allowing students to begin to think critically about the information they encounter. For all topics, the content starts with foundation knowledge (what is a cell?), builds on the foundation (how do cells divide?), and continues to a complex topic that is relevant to contemporary humans (how does cancer progress?). In many cases the historical context of the foundation knowledge is also discussed.

CRN10169
ListingBIOL 140-L02
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time
Days
CRN10170
ListingBIOL 140-L03
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time
Days
CRN10171
ListingBIOL 140-L04
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time
Days
CRN10172
ListingBIOL 140-L05
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time
Days
CRN10173
ListingBIOL 140-L98
CourseBiology I
Instructor
Time
Days

This course surveys basic principles of biology at an introductory level using examples from humans and their environment. One goal of the course is to introduce the methods of science, allowing students to begin to think critically about the information they encounter. For all topics, the content starts with foundation knowledge (what is a cell?), builds on the foundation (how do cells divide?), and continues to a complex topic that is relevant to contemporary humans (how does cancer progress?). In many cases the historical context of the foundation knowledge is also discussed.

CRN10174
ListingBIOL 140-L99
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time
Days
CRN10184
ListingBIOL 303-L01
CourseMedical Biology
InstructorNicole Hansmeier
Time
Days

The intent of this course is to provide an advanced introduction to pathogens and the concept of diseases. This course will showcase the nature of host-pathogen interactions, the intricate nature of pathomechanisms as well as the ongoing arms race between pathogens and their hosts. At the end of this course you will be familiar with pathogenic strategies to evade or overpower the human immune system, emergent diseases and their epidemiology.

Creative Technologies
CRN10741
ListingCTCH 200AL-L01
CourseVisual Identity Design
InstructorAnnalisa Raho
Time
Days

Visual Identity is the key to make a difference, and designing a visual identity means making a brand recognizable. In this course you will engage with logo design and all the pertinent visual expressions of corporate design. Through a combination of studio projects and lectures, you will explore principles of visual languages and perception applied to design composition. Experiential learning processes, guest designers, and possibly a tour to an advertising agency will give you a first-hand experience of the real professional environment. Experience the profession through projects that will become great additions to your visual portfolio!

English
CRN11180
ListingENGL 100-L01
CourseCritical Reading and Writing I
InstructorCredence McFadzean
Time
Days

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connection between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11181
ListingENGL 100-L02
CourseCritical Reading and Writing I
InstructorBen Salloum
Time
Days

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connection between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11211
ListingENGL 110-L01
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II
InstructorKathryn MacLennan
Time
Days
CRN11212
ListingENGL 110-L02
CourseCritical Reading and Writing II
InstructorMichael Horacki
Time
Days

This course will focus on literature that explores the troubled relationship between mass media and objective reality. To that end, we will study a variety of texts – including works as diverse as George Orwell’s dystopian novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four; Terry Gilliam’s film adaptation of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas; and episodes from the first season of Matthew Weiner’s long-form television series, Mad Men. Through such texts, we will approach representations of what Stephen Colbert refers to as “truthiness” in the context of totalitarian and dystopian history, the gossip column, Gonzo journalism, the newsroom, and advertising.

CRN11213
ListingENGL 110-L03
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II
InstructorScott Wilson
Time
Days

For Dr. Jesse Kavadlo, reading transgressive fiction like Fight Club is “like having your eyes rubbed raw with broken glass.” In other words, authors in this genre do not hold back; they use shocking characters and themes to question societal and artistic norms. In this course, we will focus on cults, consumption, and cleanliness, all of which relate to the absurd, often dangerous, plans characters implement to find contentment. Through the works of Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club), Katherine Dunn (Geek Love), Alissa Nutting (Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls) and others, we will discover that the genre, while controversial and subversive at times, often involves not-so-shocking motivations like the quest for acceptance, recognition, and love. We will examine the evolution of this popular genre and establish why these works, which often escape scholarly consideration, deserve more of our attention.

CRN11214
ListingENGL 110-L04
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II
InstructorNoel Chevalier
Time
Days
CRN11215
ListingENGL 110-L05
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II
InstructorAnne James
Time
Days

In this continuation of English 100-L01, we will explore the ways humans relate to the natural world and each other. Our primary reading is Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy, three works of speculative fiction set in the not-too-distant future. Atwood’s novels takes us on a tour of many current issues, including climate change, environmental destruction, social breakdown, genetic manipulation, animal rights, and the possibility of being replaced by a whole new species. Writing assignments will build on the skills acquired in English 100 and culminate in a research essay.

CRN11216
ListingENGL 110-L06
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II
InstructorJed LaCoste
Time
Days

J.R.R. Tolkien is one of the great writers of the 20th century, & his works are among the greatest achievements in fantasy fiction. We’ll discuss The Lord of the Rings, a text that is familiar due to its incredible cultural impact, as well as a number of shorter writings by Tolkien. By exploring many of the influences and contexts that shape his works, this course seeks to deepen understanding of the complex & dynamic relationship between fantasy & reality in Tolkien’s fiction and in fiction generally.

CRN11217
ListingENGL 110-L07
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II
InstructorDorothy Lane
Time
Days
CRN11229
ListingENGL 252-L01
CourseCreative Writing I
InstructorGerry Hill
Time
Days

In this Introduction to Creative Writing, you’ll produce poems, fiction, and creative nonfiction out of that fruitful space where yourself and your world intersect. Through a series of writing and reading assignments meant to challenge and delight, you’ll experience the power of your own stories, your own life material. Expect daily writing, daily attention to language choices at every level from punctuation to grand ideas, daily noodling in your journal, and daily sharing of your work with others, culminating in a semester-end public reading. What you learn will enrich your writing forever. Please note: there will be no sci-fi or fantasy in this class.

CRN11231
ListingENGL 304AL-L01
CourseSelected Author: J.K. Rowling
InstructorNoel Chevalier
Time
Days

With the completion of the seven books of the Harry Potter series, along with three books of ancillary Potter-related material composed by J.K. Rowling herself, it is now possible to begin examining Rowling's work not only as a cultural phenomenon, but as serious literary texts in their own right. This course will consider the Harry Potter books from a variety of critical perspectives. We will analyse the books' literary roots and influences, explore (among other things) political, feminist, religious, and post-structural readings of the books, evaluate the role of Internet blogs and fansites that have created a substantial body of reader-response criticism even before the series was completed, and we will, of course, consider the overall cultural impact of Harry Potter, and the interpretations of the books provided by films, toys, and even video games. Prior reading of the seven books is strongly recommended, since reading during the semester will focus on critical work and contextual literary material. Students may also read the supplementary Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, QuidditchThrough the Ages and The Tales of Beedle the Bard. All texts are widely available in a variety of formats-but note that we will be following the so-called "children's" editions published by Bloomsbury/Raincoast Books.

CRN11238
ListingENGL 387AE-L01
CourseChildren's Literature
InstructorDorothy Lane
Time
Days

This course is an examination of several well-known books for children and their cinematic counterparts. All of these books focus on human relations with the natural world; all have acquired some measure of world renown; and all have a significant spiritual component. We will explore how each text reflects and is shaped by the culture from which it emerged, and how each is subsequently translated for distinct audiences and for the medium of film. This course also examines the texts as writing that targets children: therefore, we will explore the definitions of childhood that underlie the texts. You will have an opportunity to re-experience books you read as children, with an awareness of their character as both literature and cultural artifact.

Geography
CRN11559
ListingGEOG 120-L01
CourseHuman Geography
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time
Days

This course introduces the diverse subject matter of human geography. It will discuss the changing approaches to understanding and explaining multiple issues of interest to human geographers, and how the discipline connects with the broad concerns of society.

CRN11565
ListingGEOG 232-L01
CourseGeography of Tourism & Recreation
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time
Days

The tourism industry is one of the world’s single largest industries, accounting directly for 5 per cent of global gross domestic product (GDP), providing 235 million jobs worldwide, and the 1.2 billion international tourists in 2015 generating direct revenues of US$1.3 trillion, according to the World Tourism Organization. Beyond its economic significance, tourism and recreation have social, cultural, and environmental implications for destination regions. The causes and the impacts of sex tourism, for instance, are a matter of great concern. This course will examine tourism and recreation from a geographical and an international perspective.

CRN11569
ListingGEOG 330-L01
CoursePolitical Geography
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time
Days

This course will discuss explanatory frameworks for interpreting both historical and contemporary political geography and provides in-depth insights into some of the most significant political geographic events, such as the Syrian conflict, The extremism of Boko Haram, Colonialism and the New Colonialism, the Cold War, the emerging polycentric world of competition between the Great Powers (e.g. Japan, China, Russia, India, E.U., and U.S.) and implications for world peace and the stability of the world order.

History
CRN11653
ListingHIST 114-L01
CourseIssues in History of Americas
InstructorMarc Patenaude
Time
Days

This course focuses on the role of empire and imperialism in the development of the Americas from the Pre-Columbian indigenous empires that existed prior to European contact, through to the European empires (Spain, Britain, and France) of the 15th to 18th centuries, and ending with American attempts at hegemony during the 19th and 20th centuries. These four areas of historical study will provide a comparative context through which students will analyze the role of empire and imperialism in the Americas.

CRN11666
ListingHIST 290AN- L01
CourseHistory of Africa
InstructorIbio Nzunguba
Time
Days

An introduction to the histories and diverse cultures of Africa from the earliest times to the era of colonization in the 19th century. Attention is given to the roots of African peoples in antiquity, processes of regional differentiation, and evolving patterns of trade, politics and conflict.

CRN11667
ListingHIST 290AO-L01
CourseA Social History of North America through Film and Television
InstructorKatrina Ackerman
Time
Days

From examining silent films and the advent of ‘talkies’ to digital streaming in the twenty-first century, this course provides an examination of the social history of North America through film. Drawing on films and television shows, this course explores issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality.

Interdisciplinary Studies
CRN11691
ListingIDS 101-L01
CourseInterdisciplinary Studies
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time
Days

This course will examine various topics of critical interest in the 21st Century, possibly including, but not limited to: religious diversity, social constructions of identity, consumer choices, sustainable livelihoods, and current environmental issues. We will explore ideas about locating ourselves and developing agency in a changing and challenging world. Oral and written communication skills are developed through in-class group work and informal and formal presentations. Coordinated by one faculty member, this course draws on the expertise of instructional faculty from different disciplines. Community service learning through volunteer work (approximately 12 hours for the semester) will complement the academic component of this course.

Mathematics
CRN12042
ListingMATH 110-L01
CourseCalculus I
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time
Days

An introductory course in the theory and techniques of differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Differentiation rules such as power, sum/difference, product quotient and chain rule are studied. Implicit differentiation is introduced. The fundamental theorem of calculus is introduced and the substitution technique for evaluating integrals is studied. Other topics covered include limits, related rates, optimization, curve sketching and areas.

CRN12043
ListingMATH 110-L10
CourseLAB
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time
Days
CRN12055
ListingMATH 111-L01
CourseCalculus II
InstructorFotini Labropulu
Time
Days

Inverse Functions; Differentiation and integration of exponential, logarithmic functions and inverse trigonometric functions; methods of integration and applications; indeterminate forms, L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; sequences, series, power series and Taylor series.

CRN12056
ListingMATH 111-L11
CourseLAB
InstructorFotini Labropulu
Time
Days
CRN12070
ListingMATH 217-L01
CourseDifferential Equations I
InstructorFotini Labropulu
Time
Days

Introduction to differential equations; Solutions to homogeneous and non-homogeneous ordinary differential equations; modelling with differential equations; Laplace transform.

CRN12081
ListingMATH 382-L01
CourseOrdinary Differential Equations
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time
Days

Existence and uniqueness of solutions, linear systems, non-linear equations, stability, Liapunov's method, applications.

Music & Music History
CRN12165
ListingMUHI 203-L01
CourseMusic History Survey: Middle Ages to Baroque
InstructorBarbara Reul
Time
Days

We will examine Western Classical art music and its changing role in society by focusing on a carefully selected repertory of representative composers and their oeuvres in this lecture-based survey course. Specifically, we will trace and view, through a variety of different lenses, the evolution of style and repertoire from the Middle Ages (Chant) to the late Baroque (J.S. Bach). Emphasis will be placed on sharpening students’ listening, writing, and presentation skills via a written assignment that requires students to edit their own work upon feedback received from the instructor and the LCUR Writing Across the Disciplines Coordinator; three tests (in lieu of a final exam); and an in-class presentation on an assigned topic. NOTE: 1) Attendance of concerts for credit during the semester is required; 2) This class is a continuation of MUHI 202.

CRN12166
ListingMUHI 417AA-L01
CourseThe Story of Opera
InstructorBarbara Reul
Time
Days

The focus of this course, geared at upper-level music majors, is the centuries-old tradition of opera, specifically the stories this vocal genre tells. Students will explore how operas were understood at the time of their creation and examine how operatic experiences have changed over time. A variety of assignments will enable students to hone their critical reading, viewing, writing, debating, and thinking skills, including a plot and character study and posing discussion questions on assigned readings. In lieu of a final exam, students will prepare and – upon feedback received from the instructor and the LCUR Writing Across the Disciplines Coordinator – revise journal entries that document their activities throughout the semester. NOTE: Attendance of two specific live-broadcasts in “The Met: Live in HD” series – on Feb. 2, 2019 and March 2, 2019 – is required for credit. NOTE: Students who are not majoring in music but are interested in taking this class, should contact the instructor; the successful completion of MU 100 will be an asset.

Nonprofit Sector Leadership & Innovation
CRN12213
ListingNSLI 200-L01
CourseFound of the Nonprofit Sector
InstructorYvonne Harrison
Time
Days

Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector is the first course in the Certificate in Nonprofit Sector Leadership and Innovation (NSLI). This course is an introduction to the nonprofit and voluntary sector in Canada and Saskatchewan. It examines theories about why the sector exists, the role it plays in society and contemporary public governance. It also examines the size, scope, and impact of the sector globally. The course examines the various forms and functions of nonprofit and voluntary organizations and accountability in the context of governing and managing a private not-for-profit corporation. Innovation and innovators will be discussed, including the role of information and communications technology tools and social entrepreneurs in modernizing nonprofit and volunteer work.

CRN12214
ListingNSLI 310-L01
CourseNonprofit Human Resources
InstructorLoretta Gerlach
Time
Days

A focus on human resources fundamentals and management for both paid staff and volunteers in nonprofits, including recruitment, screening, orientation, evaluation, retention, supervision/mentoring, job descriptions, policies and procedures, records management, communication and recognition, confidentiality, relationships, conflict resolution adn self care. Labour, human rights and cultural diversity standards are examined.

CRN12215
ListingNSLI 320-L01
CourseNonprofit Advocacy
InstructorGloria DeSantis
Time
Days

Explores general approaches and practical skills that can be used in working to achieve social justice-related goals, including policy analysis, political advocacy, organizational and community-based activism, public education, and community development. A variety of real-world advocacy case studies, based in the nonprofit sector, will be explored with a close examination of power, social change processes, multi-layered contextual factors and legal aspects. Students will be introduced to theoretical material as well as explore practical strategies required to achieve desired social change outcomes. Students will be able to design their own advocacy campaign by the end of the course.

CRN13192
ListingNSLI 390AA-L01
CourseDiversity
InstructorJose Sousa
Time
Days
CRN13193
ListingNSLI 390AB-L01
CourseFundraising
InstructorStephanie Kohlruss
Time
Days
Philosophy
CRN12221
ListingPHIL 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Philosophy
InstructorPaul Simard Smith
Time
Days

Introduction to the theories of morality, knowledge, and metaphysics through a critical examination of such historically significant philosophical problems as the nature and justification of value judgments, the possibility of knowledge, the existence of God, and the possibility of immortality.

CRN12225
ListingPHIL 150-L01
CourseCritical Thinking
InstructorPaul Simard Smith
Time
Days

An introduction to the systematic study of reasoning, this course will teach the theory and practice of good reasoning. It will provide students with reasoning skills that are useful in whichever discipline and career they may pursue.

CRN12231
ListingPHIL 274-L01
CoursePhilosophy of Law
InstructorPaul Simard Smith
Time
Days

Questions in legal philosophy such as: what is law? What is the relationship between law and morality? How, if at all, is punishment justified? What are the requirements for holding people responsible for their actions?

Psychology
CRN12324
ListingPSYC 101-L01
CourseIntroductory Psychology A
InstructorIan McAusland-Berg
Time
Days

An introduction to the social science aspects of psychology, including the study of adjustment, disorders, development, personality and the social environment of the person.

CRN12358
ListingPSYC 210-L01
CourseDevelopmental Psychology
InstructorAlexis Zederayko
Time
Days

A study of developmental processes across the lifespan; the interaction between environmental and biological processes; maturational and learning factors; how these interact with social influences in the developing person.

CRN12362
ListingPSYC 220-L01
CourseSocial Psychology
InstructorCarole Eaton
Time
Days

The study of human behaviour in its social context dealing with the impressions we form of others and emphasizing the influence of group membership and interactions upon important psychological processes.

CRN12364
ListingPSYC 230-L01
CoursePerspectives on Personality
InstructorCarole Eaton
Time
Days

An integrative course examining various perspectives on the study of the person.

CRN12373
ListingPSYC 333-L01
CourseAbnormal Psychology
InstructorIan McAusland-Berg
Time
Days

A comparative study of the nature and development of normal and disordered patterns of personality and behaviour.

CRN12374
ListingPSYC 336-L01
CourseHumanistic Psychology
InstructorCarole Eaton
Time
Days

The course in humanistic psychology will cover origins, history, and contemporary movements in this specialty area of psychology. Teaching methods will be congruent with the course material (learning circles, small groups, and essay format exams). Reading assignments include a basic textbook in humanistic psychology, original readings from a least one major contributor to the field, and an additional reading chosen from contemporary theorists in fields such as transpersonal psychology, cross-cultural healing, health psychology, etc.

CRN12378
ListingPSYC 388AB-L01
CoursePositive Psychology
InstructorCharles Hackney
Time
Days

Positive psychology is the study of how people thrive in the face of adversity. As an introduction to positive psychology, this course will explore historical and philosophical foundations of positive psychology while reviewing related disciplines and discussing their contributions to the field. Some areas of focus will be: well-being, virtues, values, strengths, self-actualization, love and friendships, resilience, positive affect, optimism and hope, gratitude, and lifespan. The format of the course will be didactic, experiential and interactive.

Religious Studies
CRN12435
ListingRLST 100-L01
CourseIntro to Religious Studies
InstructorMichelle Folk
Time
Days

An introduction to the academic study of religion; a survey of the thought and practices of major world religions; the impact of religion on society and culture.

CRN12436
ListingRLST 100-L02
CourseIntro to Religious Studies
InstructorMichelle Folk
Time
Days

An introduction to the academic study of religion; a survey of the thought and practices of major world religions; the impact of religion on society and culture.

CRN12440
ListingRLST 228-L01
CourseChristianity
InstructorMichelle Wagner
Time
Days

Is a crucifix a historical or a religious symbol? According to François Legault, the answer is historical. Legault further argues that since the crucifix is not "religious paraphernalia," it should be allowed to remain a historical fixture in Quebec’s National Assembly. Noting Legault’s justification, we begin our course discussing key foundations of Christianity, its religious paraphernalia and symbolism, focusing on various historical manifestations of Christianity(s) in the context of political and societal developments. Dotting our i’s and (religiously or historically) crossing our t’s, we will turn our discussion to contemporary issues, noting the complex interplay of historical, political and social factors that shape Christianity’s persona in modern society.

CRN12444
Listing390AM-L01
CourseWomen in Islam
InstructorA. Brenda Anderson
Time
Days

A stereotype, a trope, a caricature...false consciousness, resistance fighter, pious....Muslim woman! A Muslim woman in full veil contains all, and none, of these things. How about we learn about the teachings of the Qur'an, the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad, the historical schools of law to better understand why issues like what a woman wears has become so all-consuming an issue? Reading poetry, novels, theology and politics, viewing cutting edge films including hip hop and spoken word, visiting mosques and community leaders, this course can equip you to better understand Islamophobia, colonialism, gender, sexual orientation, modern politics (in particular, the Canadian context), through the lens of "that veiled woman." No prior knowledge of Islam is required for this course.

CRN12446
ListingRLST 390BX-L01
CourseMulticulturalism & Religious Literacy
InstructorA. Brenda Anderson
Time
Days

What role, if any, does religion play in the public space in a secular country? Is religion a purely private matter, and what does that mean in our understanding of history, society, cultural practices, epistemology and ontology, gender roles, rituals and ceremonies, or even politics? How might we equip ourselves to understand current issues like Islamophobia, extreme religious radicalism and its impact on politics, Quebec’s banning of religious symbols sans the crucifix, questions concerning sexual orientation and human rights…the list goes on. If you imagine yourself a critical thinker, savvy with the world, you need to understand how “religion” is part of this world. Tools of religious literacy, understandings of multiculturalism and secularism, and models of interreligious dialogue that include all, even (!) atheists, will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on our Canadian context of colonialism and the current discourse on decolonization and reconciliation.

Sociology
CRN12468
ListingSOC 211-L01
CourseEthnic and Cultural Diversity in Canada
InstructorErin Knuttila
Time
Days

"This course introduces students to sociological analyses and theories of ethnic and cultural diversity, with an emphasis on contemporary Canada. Specific topics might include Aboriginal cultures in Canadian society, issues arising from conflicts between concepts of human rights and specific cultural practices, overt and systemic racism, and controversies about immigration."

CRN12470
ListingSOC 212-L01
CourseGender and Sexuality
InstructorLori Walker
Time
Days

"This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on gender in contemporary society. The course covers aspects of recent research and of current debates on femininity and masculinity, and provides a brief introduction to some classic and contemporary theoretical perspectives on gender"

Statistics
CRN12571
ListingSTAT 100-L01
CourseElementary Stat for Apps
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time
Days

An introduction to statistical methods; descriptive statistics; the normal distribution; basic techniques of statistical inference; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for population means and proportions; simple linear regression; and one-way analysis of variance.

Women's & Gender Studies
CRN12788
ListingWGST 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Womens and Gender Studies
InstructorJeffrey Walters
Time
Days

This course wil examine the historical development of feminism and women's studies. Women's representation in academic practice will be analyzed using examples from humanities, the arts, and social sciences. Strategies for change and for the empowerment of women will be considered.

CRN12793
ListingWGST 300-L01
CourseMissing and Murdered Indigenous Women
InstructorA. Brenda Anderson
Time
Days

As the national inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls draws to a close, what are we left with? What is the historical context for violence against Indigenous women in colonized countries, and how does that continue throughout the world? This course examines the systemic reasons for racialized and sexualized violence against Indigenous women in Canada, Mexico, the U.S., Guatemala and Australia. Drawing on the experiences of community workers, family members, policy workers, police, media, spiritual leaders, academics and activists, this course requests us all to contextualize the problem and advocate for the solutions. The course is specifically designed to address the question of how we study traumatic topics and care for ourselves and for one another at the same time. You are invited to this course if you are serious about becoming part of the solution.