Arts

Did You Know?

  • Luther College offers year-round campus and residence tours as well as one-on-one enrollment counselling.

  • Luther College opened the first residence on campus in 1971, and is still a “home away from home” to students: meals, laundry, and lifelong friendship included.

  • Luther students can sign up for the UR Guarantee program - get a guaranteed job after you graduate!

  •  Every single degree program at Luther College offers an optional experiential learning component; gain real world experience and get paid while you go to school!

  • It pays to go to Luther College. Literally. Luther students are eligible for an additional $100,000 in scholarships, in addition to all of the awards available to them as U of R!

  • Luther College at the University of Regina participates in Admission on the Spot events - campus tours, reduced application fees, and the relief of finding out you're accepted to your program right away!

  • Luther students can register in Arts, Science, or Media, Art, and Performance degree programs. All degrees are awarded by the U of R.

  • Luther College offers Bundles and Bundles Plus programs! Bundles and Bundles Plus are groupings of courses hand-selected by our academic advisors to help set new students up for a successful first semester.

ARTS Degrees:

Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Bachelor of Arts Honours (BAHons)
Bachelor of Geographic Information Science (BGISc) – with Saskatchewan Polytechnic (Woodland Campus)
Bachelor of Health Studies (BHS)
Bachelor of Human Justice (BHJ)
BA in Journalism (BAJ)
Bachelor of Journalism (BJ)
BA in Police Studies (BAPS)
BA in Resource & Environmental Studies (BARES) – with Saskatchewan Polytechnic (Woodland Campus)

ARTS Diploma:

Liberal Arts Diploma

ARTS Certificates:

Advanced Certificate in Arts
Advanced Certificate in Criminal Justice
Bachelor of Arts Honours Certificate
Chinese
Economics
German
Health Studies
Indian Communication Arts
Intercultural Leadership
International Studies
Japanese
Liberal Arts
Nonprofit Sector Leadership and Innovation - NEW for Fall 2016
Political and International Governance
Spanish
Sustainability - NEW for Spring/Summer/Fall 2017

 

ARTS Subjects:

Anthropology

Picture yourself working as an anthropologist, immersing yourself in a different group or society’s daily activities and learning about its way of life—be it in a far-off island or a city like your own. It is a journey that can start right here!

The study of anthropology gives you a deep, useful, cross-cultural understanding of human beings. You will gain powerful and sometimes surprising insights into politics, culture, gender, race, language, kinship and the complexities of globalization and multiculturalism in the modern world.

Sample Courses:
Anthropology of Gender; Anthropology of Cyberspace; Ethnography of China; Popular Culture; Anthropology of Religion.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates with a degree in anthropology find success, among others, as consultants, researchers, urban planners, teachers, project managers, human rights advocates, government officials, and writers.

Chinese

"Chinese is already the most-spoken language in the world, with three times as many native speakers as English [...] In the next decade, the new 'must-learn' language is likely to be Mandarin." -The Globe and Mail, October 23, 2004

Our wide range of course offerings in Mandarin Chinese include introductory, intermediate and advanced level courses in oral and written Chinese.

Sample Courses:
Introductory Mandarin Chinese; Chinese Idioms and Short Stories; Translation; Kaleidoscope of Chinese Culture and Civilization.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as development agency workers, foreign correspondents, immigrant support workers, missionaries and translator/interpreters.

Classical and Medieval Studies

Classical and medieval studies will provide you with an understanding of Greek and Roman art, literature, languages and history. You will study the Middle Ages, the Crusades and Latin and Greek languages while developing the ability to analyze complex issues and to think creatively and analytically.

Sample Courses:
Introduction to the Civilizations of Greece and Rome; Greek Mythology; Life and Death in Middle Ages; Roman Social History; Medieval Christianity.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find success as publishers, curators, writers, media producers, editors and librarians.

Cree Language Studies

No culture can survive without the retention of its language. Studies in Indigenous Languages are designed to strengthen First Nations identity by ensuring the survival of the languages of Saskatchewan’s First Nations. Students are instilled with a sense of pride in the knowledge and use of the Indian languages. Introductory courses teach conversational fluency and an awareness of how each language works. More advanced courses explore the structures, writing systems, and literatures of Saskatchewan’s Indian languages, as well as principles of translation, expository and creative writing, oral tradition, and directed studies.

Sample Courses:
Elementary Cree; Expository Writing in Cree; Creative Writing in Cree; Interpretation: Cree-English.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as development agency workers, foreign correspondents, immigrant support workers, missionaries and translator/interpreters.

Economics

Explore how societies deal with economic problems and how they provide for the economic well-being of their citizens. Economics will help you gain a deeper understanding of how societies decide what goods and services to produce, which methods to use in production and to whom these goods and services will be distributed. It studies how limited resources are used to meet the world's competing needs.

Optional Combined Majors: Business; Geography; History; Society.

Sample Courses:
Government and the Economy; Monetary and Financial Crises; Economics of Sports; Health Care in Canada; Environmental Economics; Economics of Developing Countries.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as research officers/analysts or in banking and finance as investment services officers or financial analysts.

English

Imagine yourself as an award-winning poet or novelist, or as a government policy advisor. Maybe you like to coordinate folk festivals, design corporate websites or unearth lost manuscripts. These are some examples of where the study of English can lead.

Through this program you will learn about authors from around the globe, diverse genres and literary periods. You will also develop critical thinking and writing skills that will enhance your learning style and strengthen your communications skills.

Optional Concentration: Creative Writing.

Sample Courses:
JK Rowling; Saskatchewan Literature; English Literature & the Bible; Children’s Literature; Horror Fiction: Caught Between Fear and Pleasure; Satire and the Fantasy Voyage.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as writers, publishers, editors, advertisers, politicians and journalists. They also enter professional programs such as law, education and social work.

Environmental Studies

The environment refers to everything that surrounds us, including human beings. Under such a broad umbrella, environmental studies encompasses the study of how human beings connect with the physical structures, institutions and economies we build, the politics, language and culture by which we communicate, and the planet and its intricate variety of living and non-living elements and processes.

Sample Courses:
Environmental Impact Assessment; Microbes and the Environment; Environmental Economics; Environment and Resource Management; Environmental Hydrogeology; Environment and Justice.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find careers in three sectors: environmental sustainability, environmental protection, or conservation/preservation of natural resources.

Geography

Imagine experiencing a refreshing Caribbean breeze while you survey land use in a Jamaican town. Picture the vista surrounding you as you investigate a stream in the boreal forest or see yourself examining how wet springs have impacted farm land in the Canadian prairies.

The study of geography allows you to determine how people interact with their environment. The discipline is diverse and is based upon a blend of both natural and social sciences.

Optional Combined Major: Economics.

Sample Courses:
Human Geography; Geography of the Third World; Political Geography; Geography of Recreation and Tourism; Geomorphology; Map and Air Photo Interpretation.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs in environmental and land use planning, parks and recreation, resource management, water use and meteorology.

German

German is one of the world's influential languages, and one of the most widely spoken first languages in Europe. It is the second most commonly used scientific language in the world. Many of the Western world’s most important works of philosophy, literature, music, art history, theology, psychology, chemistry, physics, engineering and medicine are written in German and continue to be produced in German.

Optional Combined Major:Economics.

Sample Courses:
German Language and Culture; German for Business; REEL German Culture: An Examination of German Cinema; Deutsche Kultur - Vergangenheit und Gegenwart; Advanced Idiomatic Usage and Review.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find careers in education, translation, international relations, public relations, foreign affairs and many other branches of government.

Health Studies

Imagine having the skills to work with others in the health professions to make a difference in people’s lives.

A degree in Health Studies provides students with an integrated understanding of the ways in which social, economic and cultural "determinants of health" shape individual beliefs, attitudes and practices, which in turn affect physiological and biological functioning of individuals. Study draws on both the social sciences and the natural sciences, and aims at promoting knowledge development and action conducive to health. This program meets the needs of Saskatchewan and Canada as health issues continue to dominate public policy choices. A key feature of this program is its emphasis on understanding indigenous health needs.

Optional Concentration:Indigenous Health.

Sample Courses:
Lifestyle and Health; Abnormal Psychology; Health, Disease and the Body: History of Medicine in Western Culture; Methods and Theory in Documenting Oral Traditions; Traditional Indigenous Health Concepts.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates of the Bachelor of Health Studies work in the health field (government, community health programming) or pursue further education (medicine, graduate school).

History

If you enjoy discovering what caused previous generations to make decisions about great issues of their time, then history is for you. History studies the many different nations, peoples and cultures of the past from a political, idealistic, economic, social and cultural perspective. A history degree will help you understand how civilization has evolved and developed.

Optional Combined Major:Economics.

Sample Courses:
Many 9/11s?; History of the Cowboy; History of Medicine in Western Culture; European Witch Hunts; From Magic to Science: Evolution of Early Modern European Thought.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find careers in journalism, teaching, the civil service and in museums and archives. The program also provides an excellent liberal education for those who contemplate careers in law or politics.

Human Justice

The Bachelor of Human Justice degree has an applied professional focus through an introductory and advanced practical where students earn credit while acquiring professional experience. Students gain an in-depth understanding of justice related to criminal and social justice in both Canadian and international contexts.

Students will acquire skills in analytical and critical thinking and human service practices complementing their general university studies and the liberal arts.

Optional Concentrations:Criminal Justice; Social Justice.

Sample Courses:
Criminological Theories; European Witch Hunts; Women in World Religions; Environment and Justice; Forms of Racism in Canadian Society; Mediation and Dispute Resolution

Career Opportunities:
Human Justice undergraduates have found careers in: law enforcement; corrections; anti-poverty work; human rights; mental health and substance abuse; community development; and policy and research among other justice fields.

Indigenous Studies

The program is a cross-disciplinary study of Indigenous societies, cultures and knowledge. It is open to both Indigenous and non- indigenous students and explores the history and life of Indigenous people in Saskatchewan, Canada, North America and around the world. It incorporates traditional teachings offered by Elders, as well as traditional perspectives and content.

Indigenous studies courses specifically foster critical thinking skills, written and oral expression and the development of research methods.

Sample Courses:
Indigenous Political Systems of North America; Principles of Indigenous Law; Inuit Culture and History; Indigenous Systems of Religion and Philosophy; Urbanization and the Indigenous Peoples.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates work as administrators, community developers, government service workers, human rights and justice advocates, historians, lobbyists, mediator/negotiators and politicians.

International Studies

Have you ever wondered about the complex connections between society, culture, politics, economics and the environment? The international studies program is an interdisciplinary program which integrates international and regional area studies, enabling you to explore global processes and structures that connect and affect countries around the world.

Students can choose to focus on Asian studies, European studies, Development studies or International affairs.

Concentrations: Asian Studies; Development Studies; European Studies; International Affairs.

Sample Courses:
Globalization: Its Dynamics and Consequences; Global Governance: International Organizations; Globalization and Human Rights; The Middle East in the Global System; Imperialism in Latin America.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs in international trade, law and justice, multi-national corporations, international development and aid, immigration support, human rights and advocacy and diplomatic services.

Japanese

There are many reasons to study Japanese. Japanese has a different writing system than English or other European languages, but new speakers can get by simply learning 5 vowels, 39 consonant and vowel combinations, and 2 additions? These total the Japanese language's 46 'hiragana' or 'katakana' characters representing Japanese sounds – and there are no genders, plural forms, or articles to learn!

Knowing Japanese will set you apart personally and professionally! From anime to sushi, Japanese cultural exports are exploding in popularity. Knowledge of the Japanese language can give you a deeper understanding and appreciation of Japanese culture and can bring enhanced business opportunities. Being able to communicate with potential customers in their own language is a key to business, particularly in today's globalized economy. Learning Japanese can also be a gateway to learning other Asian languages and cultures.

Sample Courses:
Introductory Japanese; Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature; Japanese Culture and Tradition.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as development agency workers, foreign correspondents, immigrant support workers, missionaries and translator/interpreters.

Linguistics

Every time we utter a word, no matter how mundane, we engage in a remarkable and, to the best of our knowledge, uniquely human behavior. The ability to use language is something that should amaze us, given the fact that language represents the most complex system of communication that we know of. Linguistics is the study of this system—what its pieces are, how they combine, and how we acquire the system they form, as well as how we use it to express who we are socially and culturally. In contrast to other scholars of language, linguists are more interested in how we communicate than in what we communicate.

Sample Courses:
General Linguistics; Phonetics & Phonology; Interdisciplinary Linguistics; Survey of American Indian Languages; First Language Acquisition; Neurolinguistics; Language Universals.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find employment in translation firms, government agencies, publishers, academia, newspapers or media, acting or theatre schools, or more!

Philosophy

Do you like to explore questions related to human existence? Do you enjoy debating the meaning of life? Philosophy asks many questions and encourages us to scrutinize the everyday assumptions that shape our lives. As a philosophy student, you will study classic philosophers such as Aristotle and Plato and will explore the influential and world-changing ideas of Descartes, Marx, and Rousseau. You will learn to challenge and question the world we live in, learn to re-evaluate the everyday and theorize about different belief systems.

Sample Courses:
Contemporary Moral Issues; Ethical Issues in Science and Technology; Philosophical Study of Angels; Philosophical Issues in Sustainable Development; Philosophy of Law

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find careers in counselling, criminal justice, management, policy analysis, communications and more.

Philosophy, Politics and Economics

The University of Regina joins a handful of Canadian universities to offer the Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) undergraduate program, an internationally acclaimed qualification offered by major universities around the world.

In the PPE program, you will be able to draw upon the three disciplines of philosophy, politics and economics to examine today’s challenges using this interdisciplinary lens. Not only will you learn to identify these challenges, you will develop the knowledge and skills that could help solve them.

Sample Courses:
Foundations of PPE; Environmental Economics; Canadian Politics; Philosophical Issues in Sustainable Development.

Career Opportunities:
Since this qualification is internationally known, many graduates have launched careers in public service, business, journalism, public policy and consulting. Study of PPE provides a strong grounding for law, professional schools or graduate level studies.

PPE Course Offerings for Spring/Summer/Fall 2017 PDF

Police Studies

The BA in Police Studies offers students two options: (1) professional track program that includes a practicum with a Canadian police service; or (2) completion of an academic track program in policing, including a policing-related practicum.

The professional track program requires students to have confirmed employment with a Canadian police service or law enforcement agency prior to the commencement of their fourth year of study.

The academic track program offers students who do not wish to become a sworn member of a police service, a degree in policing. This degree introduces students to the complexity of Canadian society and to the role of law and policing in modern democracies. This innovative program exposes students to a diversity of perspectives that underlie police work, including the social realities of crime.

Sample Courses:
Professional Ethics; Abnormal Psychology; Mental Health and Substance Abuse; Psychology of Women; Missing Women; Discrimination and Social Justice; Policing in a Democratic Society.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates may find careers as a law enforcement officers, lawyers, 9-1-1 dispatchers or in the field of criminal justice, social justice, policy and communications.

Political Science

Imagine reporting on the crisis in the Middle East, writing speeches for cabinet ministers, appearing as an expert before the Supreme Court of Canada or fighting for human rights.

Political science deals with some of the most important questions faced by humankind, such as what is the nature of community and what do we expect of others and they of us? This discipline teaches you to think critically and systematically about human nature and society and the operation of our political institutions.

Sample Courses:
Canadian and World Politics; International and Industrial Relations; Public Policy; The Canadian Constitution.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find careers in diverse fields such as public administration, political strategy or consultancy, law, advocacy and community leadership and development.

Psychology

Psychology is the science of the mind; it explores the nature of human thought and behaviour. As a psychology student, you will learn how people relate to each other and the world around them, while also learning about yourself. Psychologists tackle an array of questions about what makes us human; the answers they uncover challenge our assumptions and help us to understand our ever-changing world. For example:

  • Do men and women naturally differ in intelligence, sports abilities, or in their attitudes towards relationships and politics?
  • How does stress and trauma relate to mental illness?
  • Why do juries and eye-witnesses sometimes make devastating errors that send innocent people to jail and set guilty people free?

This is just a small sample of the many timely and intriguing questions psychology students explore while pursuing a degree that will serve as excellent preparation for a variety of jobs or to attend graduate school.

Sample Courses:
Developmental Psychology; Perspectives on Personality; Psychology of Women; Positive Psychology; Foundations of Behavior; Forensic Psychology.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs in all sectors including social services, community development and outreach, education, employee development, human resources, marketing and policy analysis.

Religious Studies

Have you ever wondered about how religions have developed and the similarities between them?

Religious studies is an exciting program that teaches about people, diversity, and beliefs, and will give students insight into a broad range of religious expressions around the globe.

Religious studies offers courses in all major religious traditions and academic approaches to religious beliefs. Courses are not designed to foster personal religious commitment, but rather to study the practices, beliefs and origins of various religions academically.

Sample Courses:
Sex and Sexualities in Religion; Muslim Women in Exile; Apocalypticism; Reading the Qur’an in English; Anti-Semitism and the Holocaust; Eco-Christianity.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as writers, educators, administrators, missionaries or with graduate-level study the program can lead to a career as a professor or academic researcher.

Saulteaux Language Studies

No culture can survive without the retention of its language. Studies in Indigenous Languages are designed to strengthen First Nations identity by ensuring the survival of the languages of Saskatchewan’s First Nations. Students are instilled with a sense of pride in the knowledge and use of the Indian languages. Introductory courses teach conversational fluency and an awareness of how each language works. More advanced courses explore the structures, writing systems, and literatures of Saskatchewan’s Indian languages, as well as principles of translation, expository and creative writing, oral tradition, and directed studies.

Sample Courses:
Elementary Saulteaux; Saulteaux Transcription; Interpretation: English-Saulteaux; Oral Tradition of Saulteaux; Creative Writing in Saulteaux.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as development agency workers, foreign correspondents, immigrant support workers, missionaries and translator/interpreters.

Sociology
Sociology

Imagine working as an urban planner, government policy researcher or helping third world countries address social issues. Sociology studies the relationships between people and institutions and looks at how these relationships affect our decision making and our everyday lives. You will analyze human social behaviour and learn to understand social events and how they impact our societies. You will learn to think critically, logically and constructively about complex social issues.

Sample Courses:
Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Canada; The Sociology of Disaster; Gender; Theoretical Perspectives on Science, Culture, and Knowledge.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs as human rights workers, social policy researchers, foreign-service workers and employment counsellors.

Spanish

Why is Spanish such a popular language to study? Many Canadian immigrants are Spanish-speaking and it is the second language spoken in the U.S. As well, it is the main language spoken in 21 other countries in the world, ranging geographically from Spain to Cuba, Mexico to Argentina. A wish to travel while deepening personal and cultural experiences, a love of salsa or flamenco music, an interest in the art of Picasso or Kahlo, a desire to read authors such as Miguel Cervantes or Isabel Allende, an awareness of growing opportunities in Spanish-speaking countries for study and employment: these are some of the factors that motivate the tremendous interest in Spanish.

A knowledge of Spanish language and Hispanic cultures will enhance employment opportunities in any field, as well as opening doors to rich personal experiences.

Sample Courses:
Introduction to Hispanic Culture; Spanish American Civilization; Spanish-Language Cinema for Oral Communication; Spanish Literature.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs in diplomatic or development agencies, journalism as foreign correspondents, teaching, tourism, immigration, as missionaries and translator/interpreters or graduate level studies

Women’s and Gender Studies

Imagine providing insight on the women's rights movement or working as a case manager helping to improve life situations for young women. These are just a couple exciting examples of potential careers with the women's and gender studies program. Women and gender studies is an interdisciplinary program that provides both social science and humanities perspectives. Explore the contribution women have made to history, politics and society, learn about feminist theories and methods, learn about gender, race and class issues, develop critical reading, writing and thinking skills and learn how to analyze complex social and cultural issues.

Sample Courses:
Feminist Theory; Violence Against Women; Feminisms and Activism: Dancing Through the Minefields; Missing Women: A Global Perspective; Mapping Gender: Symbolic, Mythic, and Ritual Discourses.

Career Opportunities:
Graduates find jobs in journalism, law, policy analysis, public relations and women's health.