Current Semester

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Current Semester Luther Courses

Art & Art History
CRN10065
ListingART 290AC-L01
CourseIntroduction to Graphic Design
InstructorAnnalisa Raho
Time1430-1715
DaysM

Through a combination of studio projects and lectures, you will explore practical and theoretical principles of visual communication and perception applied to graphic design. By articulating those principles and engaging with sketches, models, and outlines we will give shape to new projects as they are realized in a professional environment.

CRN10102
ListingARTH 100-L01
Courseintroduction to Art History
InstructorJulia Krueger
Time1430-1545
DaysMW

A survey of visual culture from prehistoric times to the present.

CRN10103
ListingARTH 211-L01
CourseIntroduction to Museum Display
InstructorJulia Krueger
TimeT
Days1130-1415

Which values, traditions, and ideas regulate the public collecting and display of art? How do museums, galleries, and other institutions shape their visual messages? By investigating theoretical approaches, exploring professional practices, and engaging with hands-on experience, you will be introduced to fundamental notions regulating the museum profession

Biology
CRN10160
ListingBIOL 140-L01
CourseHuman Biology for Non-Majors
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time1130-1245
DaysMW

An introductory-level course covering the principles of biology with examples taken from humans.

CRN10161
ListingBIOL140-L02 Lab
Course
Instructor
Time0830-1115
DaysW
CRN10162
ListingBIOL 140-L03 Lab
Course
Instructor
Time1430-1715
DaysW
CRN10163
ListingBIOL 140-L04 Lab
Course
Instructor
Time0830-1115
DaysR
CRN10164
ListingBIOL 140-L05 Lab
Course
Instructor
Time1430-1715
DaysR
CRN10165
ListingBIOL 140-L98
CourseHuman Biology for Non-majors
InstructorLaura Ambrose
TimeWEB
Days

An introductory-level course covering the principles of biology with examples taken from humans.

CRN10165
ListingBIOL 140-L99 LAB
Course
Instructor
TimeWEB
Days
English
CRN11175
ListingENGL 100-L01
CourseCritical Reading & Writing I
InstructorBenjamin Salloum
Time1330-1420
DaysMWF

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connections between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11176
ListingENGL 100-L02
CourseCritical Reading & Writing I
InstructorJed LaCoste
TimeTR
Days1430-1545

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connections between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11202
ListingENGL 110-L01
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Transgressive Fiction
InstructorScott Wilson
Time1530-1620
DaysMWF

Transgressive fiction authors use shocking characters and themes to question societal and artistic norms. Their protagonists are lonely, nihilistic, anti-social characters who struggle from an often ill-defined social malaise. Through the works of Chuck Palahniuk (Choke), Patrick Suskind (Perfume), Amy Hempel (At The Gates of The Animal Kingdom) and others, this course shows that the genre, while controversial and subversive at times, often involves not-so-shocking motivations like the quest for community, recognition, and love. We will examine the evolution of this genre and establish why these works, which often escape scholarly consideration, remain so popular.

CRN11203
ListingENGL 110-L02
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Heroes, Tyrants, Celebrities--Leaders in Literature
InstructorDorothy Lane
Time1130-1245
DaysTR

Leaders face social and ethical questions when they are put in the challenging role of manager, thinker, artist, figurehead, or overall authority figure. This course focuses on works—poems, plays, fiction, nonfiction—exploring the diverse character traits we associate with leadership. Critical writing will develop skills in persuasion, reflection, and research. NB: Ideal for students who have taken ENGL 100 for Business, and those interested in Law, Education, Politics, and Community Leadership.

CRN11204
ListingENGL 110-L03
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Fabulous Beasts
InstructorStephen Moore
Time1430-1520
DaysMWF

The particular focus of this class is on stories dealing with fabulous beasts. Since the author of Genesis first recounted the serpent’s words to Eve, writers of a wide range of texts have attributed human powers such as speech and reason to non-human creatures. Moving from Aesop to Orwell, and from fable to fairytale, this course asks whether humans themselves are the most fabulous beasts of all.

CRN11205
ListingENGL 110-L04
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Children’s Fantasy Literature
InstructorKathryn MacLennan
Time0830-0945
DaysTR

Did you love the Harry Potter series and want to read more books like it? If so, this class is for you! We will study Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, and The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander. We will look at the mythological elements used in the novels, particularly the idea of an archetypal hero, as well as how these novels fit into a tradition of children's literature.

CRN11206
ListingENGL 110-L05
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Nature & Literature
InstructorAnne James
TimeMWF
Days0930-1020

In this continuation of English 100-L01, we will explore the ways humans relate to the natural world and each other. Our primary reading is Margaret Atwood’s MaddAddam trilogy, three works of speculative fiction that take us from creation stories to the imagined end of the world as we know it. These novels provide opportunities to think critically about such issues as climate change, environmental destruction, social breakdown, genetic manipulation, animal rights, and the possibility of being replaced by a whole new species. Writing assignments will culminate in a research essay.

CRN11207
ListingENGL 110-L06
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Journey to Middle Earth
InstructorJed LaCoste
Time1900-2145
DaysR

J.R.R. Tolkien is one of the great writers of the 20th century, and his works are among the greatest achievements in fantasy fiction. This course will discuss The Lord of the Rings, a text that is familiar to many students due to its incredible cultural impact, as well as a number of shorter writings by Tolkien. By exploring many of the various influences and contexts that shape Tolkien's fantasy, this course seeks to deepen students' understanding of the complex and dynamic relationship between fantasy and reality in Tolkien's fiction and in fiction generally.

CRN11221
ListingENGL 252-L01
CourseCreative Writing
InstructorTracy Hamon
Time1800-2045
DaysM

An introduction to the craft of creative writing, with work in poetry, drama, and prose fiction.

CRN11237
ListingENGL 387AE-L01
CourseChildren's Literature
InstructorDorothy Lane
Time1000-1115
DaysTR

This course is an examination of several well-known books for children and their cinematic counterparts. All of these books focus on human relations with the natural world; all have acquired some measure of world renown; and all have a significant spiritual component. We will explore how each text reflects and is shaped by the culture from which it emerged, and how each is subsequently translated for distinct audiences and for the medium of film. This course also examines the texts as writing that targets children: therefore, we will explore the definitions of childhood that underlie the texts. You will have an opportunity to re-experience books you read as children, with an awareness of their character as both literature and cultural artifact.

CRN11240
ListingENGL 485AB-L01
CoursePost-Colonial Literatures and Theory
InstructorDorothy Lane
Time1430-1545
DaysMW

This course is an examination of writing in English from former British colonies in Africa, South Asia, the Caribbean, and Canada. Through our study of postcolonial theories, we will explore the continuing process of resistance and reconstruction reflected in world literatures written in English. The range of these literatures is enormous, and our discussions will be rooted in historical, geographical, and cultural contexts of the areas. Many theorists wonder if we will ever be past the “post” in our examination of the “postcolonial.” Issues of neocolonial elites, diaspora, internal division within areas, treatment of indigenous peoples in settler/invader societies, and hybridity will ground some of the texts we read in this course, helping to open at least some of the debates in current postcolonial studies.

Geography
CRN11524
ListingGEOG 120-L01
CourseHuman Geography
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time1030-1120
DaysMWF

This course introduces the diverse subject matter of human geography. It highlights what human geography is, the foundational themes that unify this versatile area of geography, the multiple issues of interest to human geographers, and how the discipline connects with the broad concerns of society. This course will provide students with a solid foundation in geography, which will serve as a basis for further exploration.

CRN11529
ListingGEOG 232-L01
CourseGeography of Recreation and Tourism
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time0830-0945
DaysMWF

Enjoying multiple analytical approaches, this course examines the economic, social, cultural, and environmental factors and processes of recreation and tourism, and their implications on the environment, space and place, at a variety of geographical and temporal scales.

CRN11538
ListingGEOG 330-L01
CoursePolitical Geography
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time1630-1720
DaysMWF

Political geography explores the ways in which geography and politics are intertwined at a variety of spatial scales and time periods. The course will focus on geopolitics and aspects of national level politics. The course will provide students with elaborate theoretical frameworks for interpreting both historical and contemporary political geography. Deep insights will be provided on some of the most significant political geographic events, such as imperialism, the Cold War, the emerging multi-polar world, the increasing globalization of the world, the making of states, and nationalism.

History
CRN11610
ListingHIST 140-L01
CourseIssues in the History of the Americas
InstructorMark Anderson
TimeMW
Days1300-1415

During the twentieth century Latin America experienced a number of revolutions. Mostly they were reactions to colonialism. This course explores three such conflicts (Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador) as a way to understand the commonalities and the differences among them. Themes include the role of Christianity, the traditions of personalistic rule, land-tenure systems, neo-liberalism, decolonization, the Cold War, and the crucial significance of the United States.

CRN11619
ListingHIST 290AL-L01
CourseThe Story of the Imaginary Indian in North America
InstructorMark Anderson
Time1130-1415
DaysT

The "Indian" is work of colonial imagination, conjuring up a variety of racist and sexist characteristics. This course explores the creation and subsequent history of such constructions in Mexico, the United States, and Canada since 1492.

CRN11621
ListingHIST 307-L01
CourseSocial History of the "Sixties" in North America
InstructorKatrina Ackermann
Time1000-1115
DaysTR

From the "beats" of the 1950s to the fall of Saigon in 1975, babyboomer youth transformed society through the counterculture, sexual revolution, the new left, student power, environmentalism, and liberation movements, making the "Sixties" the homeland of today. The course compares the Canadian and US experiences of this turbulent era.

CRN11626
ListingHIST 373-L01
CourseThe European Witch Hunt
InstructorYvonne Petry
Time1300-1415
DaysMW

Why were tens of thousands of people - mostly women - tried for witchcraft in early modern Europe? The answer is complicated. This course will examine the origins, evolution and decline of the witch hunts in Western Europe from 1400-1700. We will consider the witch hunts from a variety of angles,including: gender and society, religion and magic, health and medicine, and politics and law. We’ll explore topics related to the witch trials, such as demonic possession cases, the role of the inquisition, and the use of torture. Students will be introduced to the primary sources that historians use to understand the past, including trial documents. Students will learn about the ways in which historians draw on fields such as psychology, sociology, anthropology and feminist theory in order to understand the history of persecution in this era.

CRN11632
ListingHIST 472-L01
CourseFrom Magic to Science: The Evolution of Early Modern European Thought
InstructorYvonne Petry
Time1430-1715
DaysR

The period between 1450 and 1700 witnessed great changes in European culture and thought. Around 1450, Renaissance scholars began to delve deeply into books of ancient magic that they believed would unlock the secrets of the universe. Alchemists sought the philosopher’s stone and astrologers tried to predict the future. However, by the end of the seventeenth century, many of the ideas that Renaissance philosophers had held dear were being questioned, discarded and replaced by a new scientific understanding. Astronomers proposed a radical new view of the heavens and thinkers like Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, and Newton developed new strategies for investigating nature. This transition, labelled the Scientific Revolution, was neither sudden nor complete. This seminar course, based on class discussions of primary and secondary source material, will trace the evolution of European thought from the magical world view of the Renaissance to the beginnings of a scientific perspective in the seventeenth century.

Interdisciplinary Studies
CRN11676
ListingIDS 101-L01
CourseInterdisciplinary Studies: Contemporary Issues
InstructorMary Vetter
Time1130-1245
DaysMW

This course will examine topics of critical interest in the 21st Century: religious diversity, social constructions of identity, consumer choices, sustainable livelihoods, and current environmental issues. We will explore ideas about locating ourselves and developing agency in a changing and challenging world. Developing communication and research skills is a focus. Coordinated by one faculty member, this course draws on the expertise of instructional faculty from different disciplines. Community service learning through volunteer work (approximately 12 hours for the semester) will complement the academic component of this course. All course work is experiential and project based.

CRN12110
ListingNSLI 330-L01
CourseNonprofit Communications
InstructorLynn Gidluck
Time1800-2045
DaysM

Communications with the general public, governments, other nonprofits, businesses, media, funders and donors in order to build intentional relationships are explored. Theory and practice are integrated in examining relationships and accountabilities. New perspectives on social media, virtual/public presence, branding, key messages, and time-sensitive response mechanisms are discussed.

CRN13043
ListingIDS 290AE
CourseCommunities and Advocacy
InstructorGloria DeSantis
Time1800-2045
DaysT

This course addresses in both theoretical and practical ways how to build and strengthen communities and help achieve their goals through advocacy. The roles of the community, governments, and other support systems are analyzed. Practical experience will be gained by working with a community group during the course.

Mathematics
CRN11988
ListingMATH 110-L01
CourseCalculus I
InstructorVijayaparvathy Agasthian
Time1130-1245
DaysTR

An introductory course in the theory and techniques of differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Differentiation rules such as power, sum/difference, product quotient and chain rule are studied. Implicit differentiation is introduced. The fundamental theorem of calculus is introduced and the substitution technique for evaluating integrals is studied. Other topics covered include limits, related rates, optimization, curve sketching and areas.

CRN12000
ListingMATH 111-L01
CourseCalculus II
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time1300-1415
DaysTR

Differentiation and integration of exponential and logarithmic functions; methods of integration and applications; indeterminate forms, L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; first order differential equations: separable equations, linear equations, exact equations, modeling, and applications; Taylor Series.

CRN12001
ListingMATH 111-L11 Lab
CourseLab
Instructor
Time1530-1620
DaysF
CRN12006
ListingMATH 122-L01
CourseLinear Algebra I
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time1000-1115
DaysTR

A course intended to introduce students to elementary linear algebra, particularly at a computational and applied level. Topics include matrices and systems of equations, inversions, determinants, vectors, inner products, eigenvectors and eigenvalues.

CRN12017
ListingMATH 382-L01
CourseOrdinary Differential Equations
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time1000-1115
DaysMW

Existence and uniqueness of solutions, linear systems, non-linear equations, stability, Liapunov's method, applications.

CRN12826
ListingMATH 110-L10
CourseLab
Instructor
Time1430-1520
DaysF
Music & Music History
CRN12058
ListingMU 299AB-L01
CourseMusic is Everywhere
InstructorBarbara Reul
Time1030-1120
DaysMWF

Let’s face it: we are surrounded by music all day long, whether we want to or not. But why, when, where and how do we listen to music? Studies have shown that it is the key to good health: listening to music reduces anxiety and helps manage pain, improves memory retention, and promotes bonding with others. In this class, you will meet your “listening personality” by actively listening to, thinking critically about, and engaging creatively with a variety of different musical genres from the past and the present. A personalized “listening journal” term project will replace the final exam. NOTE: 1) Attendance of local concerts for credit is required; 2) In response to the high cost of textbooks, *all* MU 299AB course materials will be freely accessible online or made available through UR Courses.

CRN12081
ListingMUHI 303-L01
CourseStudies in Music of the Romantic Period
InstructorBarbara Reul
Time1330-1420
DaysMWF

Beethoven…Chopin…Wagner…Verdi…Mahler – no other period has shaped music history more intensely and imaginatively than the 19th century. In this class, we will examine the contributions of representative composers to music literature of the Romantic Era (1800-1900) and investigate cultural and political forces that played a role in the creation of musical works. This course is designed to deepen students’ understanding of major genres and compositional styles, and to increase listening and writing skills throughout the semester. NOTE: Attendance of local concerts required.

Nonprofit Sector Leadership & Innovation
CRN12110
ListingNSLI 330-L01
CourseNonprofit Communications
InstructorLynn Gidluck
Time1800-2045
DaysM

Communications with the general public, governments, other nonprofits, businesses, media, funders and donors in order to build intentional relationships are explored. Theory and practice are integrated in examining relationships and accountabilities. New perspectives on social media, virtual/public presence, branding, key messages, and time-sensitive response mechanisms are discussed.

CRN13043
ListingIDS 290AE
CourseCommunties and Advocacy
InstructorGloria DeSantis
Time1800-2045
DaysT

This course addresses in both theoretical and practical ways how to build and strengthen communities and help achieve their goals through advocacy. The roles of the community, governments, and other support systems are analyzed. Practical experience will be gained by working with a community group during the course.

Philosophy
CRN12117
ListingPHIL 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Philosophy
InstructorRoger Petry
Time0930-1020
DaysMWF

Philosophy seeks to satisfy our intellectual curiosity about enduring questions: what we can know, what is meaningful, how should we live our lives—all dimensions of the traditional search for wisdom. This course will explore questions concerning knowledge and truth, mind and body, personal identity, free will, morality, politics, and the existence of God. Students will also be introduced to various areas of philosophy including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of religion.

CRN12121
ListingPHIL 150-L01
CourseCritical Thinking
InstructorPaul Omoyefa
Time1430-1545
DaysTR

An introduction to the systematic study of reasoning, this course will teach the theory and practice of good reasoning. It will provide students with reasoning skills that are useful in whichever discipline and career they may pursue.

Psychology
CRN12219
ListingPSYC 101-L01
CourseIntroductory Psychology A
InstructorPhillip Sevigny
Time1300-1415
DaysMW

An introduction to the social science aspects of psychology, including the study of adjustment, disorders, development, personality and the social environment of the person.

CRN12253
ListingPSYC 210-L01
CourseDevelopmental Psychology
InstructorSusan Weir
Time1900-2145
DaysT

A study of developmental processes across the lifespan; the interaction between environmental and biological processes; maturational and learning factors; how these interact with social influences in the developing person.

CRN12254
ListingPSYC 210-L02
CourseDevelopmental Psychology
InstructorIan MacAusland-Berg
Time1900-2145
DaysT

A study of developmental processes across the lifespan; the interaction between environmental and biological processes; maturational and learning factors; how these interact with social influences in the developing person.

CRN12257
ListingPSYC 220-L01
CourseSocial Psychology
InstructorCarole Eaton
Time1030-1120
DaysMWF

The study of human behaviour in its social context dealing with the impressions we form of others and emphasizing the influence of group membership and interactions upon important psychological processes.

CRN12259
ListingPSYC 230-L01
CoursePerspectives in Personality
InstructorCarole Eaton
Time1130-1245
DaysTR

An integrative course examining various perspectives on the study of the person.

CRN12260
ListingPSYC 230-L02
CoursePerspectives in Personality
InstructorCharles Hackney
Time1900-2145
DaysR

An integrative course examining various perspectives on the study of the person.

CRN12269
ListingPSYC 333-L01
CourseAbnormal Psychology
InstructorSusan Weir
Time1900-2145
DaysR

A comparative study of the nature and development of normal and disordered patterns of personality and behaviour.

CRN12270
ListingPSYC 336-L01
CourseHumanistic Psychology
InstructorMary Hampton
Time1300-1415
DaysTR

The course in humanistic psychology will cover origins, history, and contemporary movements in this specialty area of psychology. Teaching methods will be congruent with the course material (learning circles, small groups, and essay format exams). Reading assignments include a basic textbook in humanistic psychology, original readings from at least one major contributor to the field, and an additional reading chosen from contemporary theorists in fields such as transpersonal psychology, cross-cultural healing, health psychology, etc.

CRN12271
ListingPSYC 388AB-L01
CoursePositive Psychology
InstructorPhillip Sevigny
Time1000-1115
DaysTR

Positive psychology is the study of how people thrive in the face of adversity. As an introduction to positive psychology, this course will explore historical and philosophical foundations of positive psychology while reviewing related disciplines and discussing their contributions to the field. Some areas of focus will be: well-being, virtues, values, strengths, self-actualization, love and friendships, resilience, positive affect, optimism and hope, gratitude, and lifespan. The format of the course will be didactic, experiential and interactive.

Religious Studies
CRN12318
ListingRLST 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Religious Studies
InstructorRichard Hordern
Time0930-1020
DaysMWF

An introduction to the academic study of religion; a survey of the thought and practices of major world religions; the impact of religion on society and culture.

CRN12319
ListingRLST 100-L02
CourseIntroduction to Religious Studies
InstructorMichelle Folk
Time1000-1115
DaysTR

An introduction to the academic study of religion; a survey of the thought and practices of major world religions; the impact of religion on society and culture.

CRN12322
ListingRLST 228-L01
CourseChristianity
InstructorRichard Hordern
Time1130-1245
DaysTR

Christianity is still the largest religion in the world today and, due to increases in Africa and Asia in particular, one of the fastest growing. This course will introduce students to this dynamic religion which had its origins in history 2000 years ago. The centrality of Jesus will be examined as found in the Bible and other sources. Christianity’s roots in Judaism and its sources of authority and doctrinal development, especially over the first few centuries will be explored and questioned. Further historical and theological developments through the medieval and into current times will also be explored. Students will study worship practices and rituals as practiced today and in the past. Major denominational families and contemporary issues, including the place of women, will also be outlined.

CRN12324
ListingRLST 245-L01
CourseBible: Old Testament/Tanakh
InstructorFranz Greifenhagen
Time1300-1415
DaysTR

What is the Old Testament (for Christians) or the Tanakh (for Jews) or the Hebrew Bible (for scholars)? You will discover this book to be many things: a collection of historical documents, a literary compilation, and a conversation partner, or revelation, on deep societal and spiritual issues, such as identity, family, gender, ethnicity, politics, and ideas about God. You can expect careful reading of biblical texts with attention to historical origins and context, translation, literary structure and interpretation.

CRN12329
ListingRLST 390AM-L01
CourseWomen in Islam
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1430-1715
DaysM

This course studies the numerous constructs of gender and sexualities in Islamic teachings and practices. Our enquiry is scriptural, historical and contemporary, with a particular eye to the impact of colonialism and subsequent writings of postcolonial feminists. The rapid growth of Muslim women’s literature and their leadership roles in North America and especially Canada will be of interest to us, as will the debates between traditionalists and modernists, nationalists and liberals, fundamentalists and feminists, insiders (emic) and outsiders (etic).

CRN12330
ListingRLST 390AY-L01
CourseYoga
InstructorColin Hall
Time1430-1545
DaysTR

This course is a basic introduction to the study of yoga. Students will familiarize themselves with the foundational teachers, texts, and practices of the yoga tradition.

CRN12333
ListingRLST 390BX-L01
CourseMulticulturalism & Religious Literacy
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1000-1115
DaysTR

Religious literacy within the constructs of Canadian secularism and multiculturalism is examined historically and with comprehensive conversations regarding models of interreligious dialogue, advocacy, feminist responses, and covering the most current topics, e.g. accommodation principles, educational responsibilities, the rise of Islamophobia, public space and prayer, and more.

CRN12993
ListingRLST 290AX-L01
CourseMartin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X: Religion and Violence
InstructorRichard Hordern
Time1130-1245
DaysMW

Martin Luther King Jr. adopted non-violent methods for achieving justice and freedom for Black Americans during the Civil Rights Movement. But Malcolm X, a founder of the Black Power movement, said that only violence could bring changes to the structures of racism and hate embedded in American culture. Who was right?

Sociology
CRN12355
ListingSOC 209-L01
CourseReligion and Society
InstructorColin Hall
Time0930-1020
DaysMWF

This course introduces students to sociological analyses and theoretical perspectives on the place of religion in modern society. The course focuses on issues such as secularization, fundamentalism, sects and cults, and Third World religious movements.

CRN12356
ListingSOC 211-L01
CourseEthnic and Cultural Diversity in Canada
InstructorLori Walker
Time1430-1520
DaysMWF

This course introduces students to sociological analyses and theories of ethnic and cultural diversity, with an emphasis on contemporary Canada. Specific topics might include Aboriginal cultures in Canadian society, issues arising from conflicts between concepts of human rights and specific cultural practices, overt and systemic racism, and controversies about immigration.

CRN12358
ListingSOC 212-L01
CourseGender
InstructorJeffrey Walters
Time1230-1320
DaysMWF

This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on gender in contemporary society. The course covers aspects of recent research and of current debates on femininity and masculinity, and provides a brief introduction to some classic and contemporary theoretical perspectives on gender.

CRN12361
ListingSOC 213-L01
CourseFamilies
InstructorLori Walker
Time1430-1545
DaysTR

This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on the family, with emphasis on issues of particular importance in contemporary Canadian society. Specific topics might include the impact of social change on family relationships, changing definitions of the family, children's rights, concepts of fatherhood and motherhood, and same-sex marriage.

CRN12364
ListingSOC 215-L01
CourseThe Sociology of Crime and Criminal Justice
InstructorLori Walker
Time1000-1115
DaysTR

This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on the study of crime and justice. The course examines sociological concepts of deviance, punishment, and social control.

Statistics
CRN12444
ListingSTAT 100-L01
CourseElementary Statistics for Applications
InstructorVijayaparvathy Agasthian
Time0930-1020
DaysMWF

An introduction to statistical methods; descriptive statistics; the normal distribution; basic techniques of statistical inference; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for population means and proportions; simple linear regression.

Women's & Gender Studies
CRN12615
ListingWGST 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Women's & Gender Studies
InstructorJeffrey Walters
Time1130-1220
DaysMWF

This course will examine the historical development of feminism and women's studies. Women's representation in academic practice will be analyzed using examples from humanities, the arts, and social sciences. Strategies for change and for the empowerment of women will be considered.

CRN12619
ListingWGST 300-L01
CourseMissing Indigenous Women: A Global Perspective
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1430-1715
DaysW

Why are Indigenous women around the world more likely to "go missing" than non-Indigenous women? What does “sexualized racism" mean and how is it perpetuated through cultural scripts, institutions, and systems? This class examines the systems that intersect and perpetuate racism and sexism in colonized countries; specifically, Canada, Australia, Mexico, and Guatemala will be studied. The social and economic effects of globalization on women are studied, including the issue of sex trafficking between Canada and the U. S., Thailand, and the Philippines. Expertise and perspectives of family members, community activists, the police force, media, Elders and church leaders will be integrated into this class, all with the intention to seek justice and healing. This course will take The Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Inquiry into special consideration.

Winter 2017 Luther and Campion College Course Booklet