Luther Lecture

Did You Know?

  • Luther students can register in Arts, Science, or Media, Art, and Performance degree programs. All degrees are awarded by the U of R.

  • Luther grads attend a special graduation ceremony and luncheon celebration at Luther College as well as the U of R convocation ceremony

  • The Luther College Residence is a great place for student athletes; it’s conveniently located and comes with a great meal plan.

  • Luther College students pay the same tuition and fees as other University of Regina students.

  • The Luther College Residence offers an early payment discount. You can save up to $225 when you pay by August 15 (for Fall) and/or December 15 (for Winter)!

  • The Luther Library has over 18,000 items in its collection, 3,000 books checked out per year, and 6,000 students who come through its door per month.

  • Luther College opened the first residence on campus in 1971, and is still a “home away from home” to students: meals, laundry, and lifelong friendship included.

  • Luther College welcomes students of all faiths, ethnicities, backgrounds, religions, genders, and sexual orientation.

Luther Lecture - Dr. Nicholas Terpstra

This year’s Luther Lecturer is Dr. Nicholas Terpstra, Professor of History, Univerisity of Toronto. The title of his lecture will be "Reframing the Reformation: Religious Refugees in the Early Modern World." The lecture will be held on Monday, October 30, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in the Rex Schneider Auditorium, second floor at Luther College at the University of Regina.

The year 2017 is being marked as the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Martin Luther’s 1517 protest against indulgences set in motion a series of events that led to the fracturing of the Roman Catholic Church and the rise of many different protestant denominations around Europe and across the globe. The Reformation has often been seen as marking the dawn of the modern era and inspiring an expansion of intellectual and political freedoms. Yet it is sobering to realize that it was also the time when the religious refugee became a mass phenomenon. Does the period and its significance look different if we look at it from the viewpoint of religious refugees? How did movements for religious reform create new numbers of refugees while also creating new ways of sheltering them and providing new forms of religious life? What might the Reformation mean for us today, when the number of refugees is again growing rapidly, and when many of the global conflicts that have set them on the road are rooted at least in part in religious divisions?


The Luther Lecture was established by Luther College at the University of Regina in 1977 with the purpose of making a distinctive and stimulating contribution to the life of the University and the general community. Annually, a distinguished scholar or leader of note is invited to give a public talk on matters of spiritual and social importance.

The 2017 Luther Lecture is provided in part through a generous grant from the members of Faith Life Financial and the James Kurtz Memorial Trust Fund.