Luther Lecture

Did You Know?

  • Luther College offers Bundles and Bundles Plus programs! Bundles and Bundles Plus are groupings of courses hand-selected by our academic advisors to help set new students up for a successful first semester.

  • Luther College opened the first residence on campus in 1971, and is still a “home away from home” to students: meals, laundry, and lifelong friendship included.

  • All programs at Luther College offer study abroad opportunities. As an affiliate of the U of R, we have partnerships with 450 universities across 70 different countries.

  •  Every single degree program at Luther College offers an optional experiential learning component; gain real world experience and get paid while you go to school!

  • The Luther College Residence is a great place for student athletes; it’s conveniently located and comes with a great meal plan.

  • ALL U of R students including Luther students can take Luther courses.

  • Luther College at the University of Regina participates in Admission on the Spot events - campus tours, reduced application fees, and the relief of finding out you're accepted to your program right away!

  • It pays to go to Luther College. Literally. Luther students are eligible for an additional $100,000 in scholarships, in addition to all of the awards available to them as U of R!

Luther Lecture - Dr. Nicholas Terpstra

This year’s Luther Lecturer is Dr. Nicholas Terpstra, Professor of History, University of Toronto. The title of his lecture will be "Reframing the Reformation: Religious Refugees in the Early Modern World." The lecture will be held on Monday, October 30, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in the Rex Schneider Auditorium, second floor at Luther College at the University of Regina.

The year 2017 is being marked as the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Martin Luther’s 1517 protest against indulgences set in motion a series of events that led to the fracturing of the Roman Catholic Church and the rise of many different protestant denominations around Europe and across the globe. The Reformation has often been seen as marking the dawn of the modern era and inspiring an expansion of intellectual and political freedoms. Yet it is sobering to realize that it was also the time when the religious refugee became a mass phenomenon. Does the period and its significance look different if we look at it from the viewpoint of religious refugees? How did movements for religious reform create new numbers of refugees while also creating new ways of sheltering them and providing new forms of religious life? What might the Reformation mean for us today, when the number of refugees is again growing rapidly, and when many of the global conflicts that have set them on the road are rooted at least in part in religious divisions?


The Luther Lecture was established by Luther College at the University of Regina in 1977 with the purpose of making a distinctive and stimulating contribution to the life of the University and the general community. Annually, a distinguished scholar or leader of note is invited to give a public talk on matters of spiritual and social importance.

The 2017 Luther Lecture is provided in part through a generous grant from the members of Faith Life Financial and the James Kurtz Memorial Trust Fund.