Yvonne Petry (History)

Did You Know?

  • Luther College offers year-round campus and residence tours as well as one-on-one enrollment counselling.

  • Luther College students pay the same tuition and fees as other University of Regina students.

  • Luther students can register in Arts, Science, or Media, Art, and Performance degree programs. All degrees are awarded by the U of R.

  • Luther College opened the first residence on campus in 1971, and is still a “home away from home” to students: meals, laundry, and lifelong friendship included.

  • Luther students enjoy personalized one-on-one academic advising: our academic advisors are here to help you from registration to graduation.

  • The Luther Library has over 18,000 items in its collection, 3,000 books checked out per year, and 6,000 students who come through its door per month.

  • ALL U of R students including Luther students can take Luther courses.

  • The Luther College Residence hosts multiple social events and programs throughout the year, such as Christmas Dinner, International Night, Mardi Gras, and Karaoke Night.

A “Story from the Podium”

By Yvonne Petry (History)

One of my most memorable moments as a student came while I was attending the Lutheran Theological Seminary (LTS) in Saskatoon, where I studied for a semester after my B.A. and before my M.A. I was taking two courses from Dr. John Kleiner: “History of the Reformation” and “History of Jewish-Christian Relations”. From the very first day of class in the winter of 1988, Dr. Kleiner was a professor I knew I would like. He certainly possessed a keen intellect and vast knowledge, qualities that I had seen in most of my professors up to that point. However, he added to the expected scholarly attributes a dry sense of humour and a genuinely affable, good-hearted nature. He really seemed to enjoy teaching and interacting with his students.

The day that stands out in my mind most clearly occurred during the course on Jewish-Christian relations. Most of the course material was historical in nature, but on one particular day, Dr. Kleiner spoke about his German upbringing, and related an incident from his own childhood when, for reasons he didn’t fully understand himself, he said something mean to a Jewish boy in his class. As he told us this story, his eyes teared up. I had never before seen any professor – and certainly not a male history professor – talk about something so personal and reveal such candid emotion. The lesson I took from that day is that professors really are people, and that becoming an academic doesn’t mean discarding or camouflaging one’s humanity or one’s vulnerability.

Dr. Kleiner was a friend and mentor to me for many years afterwards. Based on the two courses that I took from him at LTS, I decided to pursue graduate studies in Reformation history. My studies at both the master’s and doctoral level involved the history of Jewish-Christian relations, a legacy of the interest that he had sparked in me that first semester. Dr. Kleiner passed away in 2004, and I still miss his kindness, warmth, good sense, and thoughtful guidance.