Michael Horacki

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Michael Horacki

Dr. Michael Horacki
michael.horacki@uregina.ca

 


Dr. Michael Horacki received his B.A. (Honours) in English from the University of Regina (2008), his M.A. in English from Queen’s (2009), and his Ph.D. in English from the University of Saskatchewan (2019) with a specialty in Literary Theory.

Current Research

Dr. Horacki’s research interests include assemblage theory, modernism/modernity studies, British interwar fiction, and mass media. His dissertation, Memory, Interpellation, and Assemblage: Multivalent Assemblage in the Novels of Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, and Evelyn Waugh (2019), examines the relationship between individual and group identity in the fiction of the three authors. His current work expands on his dissertation project, focusing on the relationship between unstable social positions and individual identity following WWI, the threats posed to individual subjectivity by modernity in interwar fiction, and attempts to use collective memory and history to form stable identity in the face of the Displaced Persons crisis at the end of WWII.

Research Areas

  • Assemblage Theory
  • Interpellation
  • Modernism/Modernity
  • Semiotics
  • Subjectivity

Courses Taught

ENGL 100 – Critical Reading & Writing I
ENGL 110 – Critical Reading & Writing II: Mass Media and Misinformation
ENGL 100 & 110 – Online Sections