Michael Horacki

Did You Know?

  • Living in The Student Village at Luther College, our student residence, comes with a choice of healthy, nutritious meal plans. That means no grocery shopping, no meals to cook, and no dirty dishes to worry about. You can focus on your studies and wellness!

  • Luther College appeals to students who want to study in a safe, nurturing, and inclusive environment. We welcome students of all faiths, ethnicities, backgrounds, religions, genders, and sexual orientations.

  • Luther students can register in Arts, Science, or Media, Art, and Performance. Luther students are U of R students and receive a U of R degree.

  • Luther College offers Bundles programs that group together first-year students and classes to give you a great start and help ease the transition from high school to university.

  • Our student residence, The Student Village at Luther College, is a great place for student athletes to call home. The U of R Kinesiology Building is footsteps away with its Olympic size pool, gymnasium, and health centre.

  • Free entrance counselling support and invaluable one-on-one academic advising are available for all programs at Luther College.

  • Wondering where to live? Our student residence, The Student Village at Luther College, is considered the best choice for first-year student accommodation. Individual private rooms mean you can stick to your own schedule and you never have to deal with roommate hassles.

  • Luther College students can sign up for the UR Guarantee program - get a job guaranteed after you graduate.

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Michael Horacki

Dr. Michael Horacki
LC 224
306-206-2088
michael.horacki@uregina.ca

 


Dr. Michael Horacki received his B.A. (Honours) in English from the University of Regina (2008), his M.A. in English from Queen’s (2009), and his Ph.D. in English from the University of Saskatchewan (2019) with a specialty in Literary Theory.

Current Research

Dr. Horacki’s research interests include assemblage theory, modernism/modernity studies, British interwar fiction, and mass media. His dissertation, Memory, Interpellation, and Assemblage: Multivalent Assemblage in the Novels of Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, and Evelyn Waugh (2019), examines the relationship between individual and group identity in the fiction of the three authors. His current work expands on his dissertation project, focusing on the relationship between unstable social positions and individual identity following WWI, the threats posed to individual subjectivity by modernity in interwar fiction, and attempts to use collective memory and history to form stable identity in the face of the Displaced Persons crisis at the end of WWII.

Research Areas

  • Assemblage Theory
  • Interpellation
  • Modernism/Modernity
  • Semiotics
  • Subjectivity

Courses Taught

ENGL 100 – Critical Reading & Writing I
ENGL 110 – Critical Reading & Writing II: Mass Media and Misinformation
ENGL 100 & 110 – Online Sections