Dorothy Lane

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Dorothy Lane

Dr. Dorothy Lane
LC 227
306-585-5217
dorothy.lane@uregina.ca
Dorothy Lane CV


Dr. Dorothy Lane completed her Ph.D. in English, specializing in postcolonial literature, at Queen’s University in 1992. She has taught English at Luther College at the University of Regina since 1993 as well as in the Interdisciplinary Studies Program from 1997-2002. She has served in a number of administrative positions, including Chair of the University’s Faculty Association (2005-2008) and head of the University’s English department (2008-2011). Dr. Lane has published and presented locally and internationally on a wide variety of topics, including pedagogical initiatives and travel narratives; her most recent research focuses on pilgrimage narratives related to South Asia. She teaches senior-level courses in Canadian, postcolonial, and children’s literature; she has supervised both senior undergraduate and graduate students, and has served on dissertation committees for two doctoral students in Education. She is an active member of St. Paul’s (Anglican) Cathedral in Regina, Saskatchewan.

 

Courses Taught

ENGL 100 – Critical Reading and Writing
ENGL 110 – Critical Reading and Writing II (Cultural Studies)
ENGL 213 (formerly 312)  – Canadian Literature Survey
ENGL 322 – Postcolonial Literature
ENGL 387 – Children’s Literature
ENGL 455/820 – Australian Fictions
ENGL 485/811 – Postcolonial Literatures and Theory
ENGL 475/815 – Advanced Children’s Literature

 

Selected Recent Academic Publications

“‘Dominion from Sea to Sea’: Christianity, Imperialism, and the Trope of Conversion.” A Sea for Encounters: Essays Towards a Postcolonial Commonwealth. Ed. Stella Borg-Barthet. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2009. 177-191.

“The Language of Trauma.” Canadian Children’s Literature 32.1 (2006): 170-179.

“’One Power, One Mind’: Religious Diversity and British Dominion in India.” Literature and Theology 19.3 (2005): 251-264

“Boundaries and Interpretations: Learning in India.” International Journal of the Humanities 2.2 (2004): 1393-1404.

“Dominionisation or Infiltration: Religion and the Territorial Imperative in Postcolonial Writing.” Resistance or Reconciliation.  Ed. Susan Cowan and Bruce Bennett. Canberra: ACLALS, 2003. 114-129. 

"Deliver Their Land From Error’s Chain’: Conversion, Convictism, and Christianity in Australian Literature.” Mapping the Sacred: Religion, Geography and Postcolonial Literatures.  Ed. James Scott and Paul Simpson-Housley. Amsterdam: Editions Rodopi, 2001. 92-108.        

“The Dominion Project: Strategies for Political and Religious Colonization in Canadian Settler Writing.”  Mapping the Sacred: Religion, Geography and Postcolonial Literatures. Ed. James Scott and Paul Simpson-Housely. Amsterdam: Editions Rodopi, 2001. 38-52. 

“The Commonwealth in Canadian Literature.” Reader’s Encyclopedia of Canadian Literature.  Ed. W.H. New. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2003.

 "To Our Remotest Border’: Christianity and Empire in Canadian Writing.” Spirit of Place: Source of the Sacred?  Ed. Griffith and Tulip. Sydney: Centre for Religion, Literature and the Arts, 1999. 262-274.

“Articulating the ‘Bi-Langue’: Culturo-Linguistic Layering and Witi Ihimaera’s Dear Miss Mansfield.” Translating Cultures. Aarhus: Dangaroo, 1999. 369-385.