Charles H. Hackney

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Charles Hackney

Dr. Charles H. Hackney
charles.hackney@uregina.ca

 


Dr. Hackney has been a regular Sessional Instructor at Luther College since 2011, after moving to Saskatchewan from Ontario. Dr. Hackney grew up in Alaska, earned his PhD in Social/Personality Psychology from the University at Albany SUNY, and has lived in Canada since 2003. His research interests include positive psychology, the psychology of religion, experimental existential psychology, the integration of psychology and Christianity, and the psychology of the martial arts. In addition to his work at Luther College, Dr. Hackney is Chair of the Psychology Department at Briercrest College and Seminary, is an instructor at the Moose Jaw Koseikan Judo Club, and is the author of the book Martial Virtues.

Courses Taught

PSYC 102 (Introductory Psychology B)
PSYC 210 (Lifespan Development)
PSYC 230 (Perspectives on Personality)
PSYC 388 (Positive Psychology)

Selected Recent Academic Publications

Pennington, J. T., & Hackney, C. H. (2017). Resourcing a Christian positive psychology from the Sermon on the Mount.
    Journal of Positive Psychology, 12, 427-435.
Hackney, C. H. (2015). “Silk ribbons tied around a sword”: Knighthood and the chivalric virtues in Westeros. In J. Battis
    & S. Johnston (Eds.), Mastering the game of thrones: Essays on George R. R. Martin's a song of ice and fire (pp. 132-149).     Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company.
Hackney, C. H. (2014) Imperfectible: Why positive psychology needs original sin. Christian Psychology, 8, 5-14.
Hackney, C. H. (2014) Imperfectible: Reply to commentaries. Christian Psychology, 8, 33-37.   
Hackney, C. H. (2013). Traditional martial arts as pathways to flourishing. In J. Sinott (Ed.), Positive psychology: Advances
    in understanding adult motivation
(pp. 145-158). New York: Springer Publishing.
Hackney, C. H. (2011). The effect of mortality salience on the evaluation of humorous material. Journal of Social
    Psychology
, 151, 51-62. doi: 10.1080/00224540903366735
Murphy, N., & Hackney, C. H. (2011). An interview with Nancey Murphy: Constructing an Anabaptist vision of ideal
    psychological functioning. Edification: The Transdisciplinary Journal of Christian Psychology, 4, 73-78.
Hackney, C. H. (2010). Martial virtues. North Clarendon, VT: Charles E. Tuttle Publications.
Hackney, C. H. (2010). Sanctification as a source of theological guidance in the construction of a Christian positive
    psychology. Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 29, 195-207.
Hackney, C. H. (2010). Religion and mental health: What do you mean when you say “religion?” What do you mean
    when you say “mental health?” In P. Verhagen, H. van Praag, J. Lopez-Ibor, J. Cox, & D. Moussaoui (Eds.), Religion and
    psychiatry: Beyond boundaries
(pp. 343-360). London, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Hackney, C. H. (2010). Positive psychology and Vanhoozer’s theodramatic model of flourishing. Edification: The
    Transdisciplinary Journal of Christian Psychology
, 4, 24-27.