Upcoming Semester

Did You Know?

  • The Luther Library has over 24,000 items in its collection, 5,000 books checked out per year, and 7,000 students who come through its door per month.

  • Luther College offers Bundles programs that group together first-year students and classes to give you a great start and help ease the transition from high school to university.

  • Free entrance counselling support and invaluable one-on-one academic advising are available for all programs at Luther College.

  • Smaller class sizes at Luther College means more individualized attention and better connections with your professors, classmates, and academic advisors.

  • You can book a tour of Luther College, the U of R campus, and our student residence, The Student Village at Luther College, any time throughout the year. Contact our Recruitment Office at 1-306-206-2117.

  • Our student residence, The Student Village at Luther College, is a great place for student athletes to call home. The U of R Kinesiology Building is footsteps away with its Olympic size pool, gymnasium, and health centre.

  • Luther College is the first choice for high school to university transition. Enjoy all the benefits of a larger campus, without feeling lost in the crowd. Our community is full of caring mentors and peers to ensure a positive student experience.

  • Eating better means studying better. The Luther Cafeteria offers fresh, healthy, nutritious meals seven days a week with a self-serve “all-you-care-to-eat” concept students prefer.

Upcoming Semester Luther Courses

Art & Art History
CRN10069
ListingART 290AC-L01
CourseIntroduction to Graphic Design
InstructorAnnalisa Raho
Time1430 - 1715
DaysT

Graphic design surrounds us and we are exposed to a diverse range of messages through various media. What rules do the designers follow? How do they strategize their projects to guide the viewer’s perception? Through a combination of studio projects and lectures, you will explore principles of visual strategies and perception applied to design composition. By actively engaging with sketches, models, and outlines of existing projects, we will explore fundamental elements of the design composition such as alignment, proportion, visual weight, and color. Furthermore, we will design new projects as if they were realized in a professional environment.

CRN10106
ListingARTH 210-L01
CourseIntroduction to Curatorial Studies
InstructorFrancesco Freddolini
Time1430 - 1715
DaysM

What is curation, and what do curators do? This course will introduce you to the history, theories and practices of curation, addressing curators’ responsibilities in building and presenting collections in various institutional settings, as well as curators’ interactions with artists and other professional profiles involved in planning exhibitions. Through lectures, experiential learning, and hands-on projects, this course will give you an overview of the world of curation, and the communicative power of the curated object.

Biology
CRN10158
ListingBIOL 140-L01
CourseHuman Biology for Non-majors
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

This course surveys basic principles of biology using examples from humans and their environment. An important aspect of the course is to introduce the methodology of science, in order to encourage critical analysis of science content presented in popular media. For all topics, the content starts with foundation knowledge (what is a cell?), builds on the foundation (how do cells divide?), and continues to a complex topic that is relevant to contemporary humans (how does cancer progress?). In many cases the historical context of the foundation knowledge is also introduced. Lab activities supplement and expand on lecture content.

CRN10159
ListingBIOL 140-L02
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time0830 - 1115
DaysW
CRN10160
ListingBIOL 140-L03
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time1430 - 1715
DaysW
CRN10161
ListingBIOL 140-L04
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time1430 - 1715
DaysR
CRN10162
ListingBIOL 140-L05
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time1430 - 1715
DaysT
CRN10163
ListingBIOL 140-L98
CourseHuman Biology for Non-majors
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time
DaysWEB

This course surveys basic principles of biology using examples from humans and their environment. An important aspect of the course is to introduce the methodology of science, in order to encourage critical analysis of science content presented in popular media. For all topics, the content starts with foundation knowledge (what is a cell?), builds on the foundation (how do cells divide?), and continues to a complex topic that is relevant to contemporary humans (how does cancer progress?). In many cases the historical context of the foundation knowledge is also introduced. Lab activities supplement and expand on lecture content.

CRN10164
ListingBIOL 140-L99
CourseLAB
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time
DaysWEB
CRN10175
ListingBIOL 303-L01
CourseMedical Microbiology
InstructorNicole Hansmeier
Time1430 - 1545
DaysMW

The intent of this course is to provide an advanced introduction to pathogens and the concept of diseases. This course will showcase the nature of host-pathogen interactions, the intricate nature of pathomechanisms as well as the ongoing arms race between pathogens and their hosts. At the end of this course you will be familiar with pathogenic strategies to evade or overpower the human immune system, emergent diseases, and their epidemiology.

Creative Technologies
CRN10639
ListingCTCH 200AL-L01
CourseVisual Identity Design
InstructorAnnalisa Raho
Time1130 - 1415
DaysR

Visual Identity is the key to make a difference, and designing a visual identity means making a brand recognizable. In this course you will engage with logo design and all the pertinent visual expressions of corporate design. Through a combination of studio projects and lectures, you will explore principles of visual languages and perception applied to design composition. Experiential learning processes, guest designers, and possibility a tour to an advertising agency will give you a first-hand experience of the real professional environment. Experience the profession through projects that will become great additions to your visual portfolio!

English
CRN11095
ListingENGL 100-L01
CourseCritical Reading and Writing I
InstructorBenjamin Salloum
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connections between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11096
ListingENGL 100-L02
CourseCritical Reading and Writing I
InstructorJed LaCoste
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connections between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11122
ListingENGL 110-L01
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Mass Media and Misinformation
InstructorMichael Horacki
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

This course will focus on literature that explores the troubled relationship between mass media and objective reality. To that end, we will study a variety of texts – including works as diverse as George Orwell essays; novels by Hunter S. Thompson and Evelyn Waugh; and episodes from the first season of Matthew Weiner’s long-form television series, Mad Men. Through such texts, we will approach representations of what Stephen Colbert refers to as “truthiness” in the context of totalitarian and dystopian history, the gossip column, Gonzo journalism, the newsroom, and advertising.

CRN11123
ListingENGL 110-L02
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Transgressive Fiction (JUSTICE & JOURNALISM BUNDLE)
InstructorScott Wilson
Time1000 - 1115
DaysWF

For Dr. Jesse Kavadlo, reading transgressive fiction is “like having your eyes rubbed raw with broken glass.” So, authors in this genre use shocking characters and themes to question societal and artistic norms. We will focus on cults, consumption, and cleanliness, all of which relate to the absurd, often dangerous, plans characters implement to try to find contentment. Through Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club), Katherine Dunn (Geek Love), Alissa Nutting (Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls) and others, we will discover that this genre, while controversial at times, often involves not-so-shocking motivations like the quest for acceptance, recognition, and love.

CRN11124
ListingENGL 110-L03
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Children's Fantasy Literature
InstructorKathryn MacLennan
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

Did you love the Harry Potter series and want to read more books like it? If so, this class is for you! We will study Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman, and The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander. We will look at the mythological elements used in the novels, particularly the idea of an archetypal hero, as well as how these novels fit into a tradition of children's literature.

CRN11125
ListingENGL 110-L04
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Winter Writings
InstructorBenjamin Salloum
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

Over the Winter semester, this course will examine the literary significance of the Winter season. Students will read a variety of contemporary texts that are either set in or concerned with Winter. The goal of the class is to consider how different writers dramatize the central conflicts and explore the psychological dimensions of the darkest and, in some ways, most intimate time of year. Texts will include short fiction, novels, poetry, and a critical study of the season.

CRN11126
ListingENGL 110-L05
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Engineering Souls: Biology, Technology and Humanity (ENGLISH/SCIENCE BUNDLE)
InstructorNoel Chevalier
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

This semester, we will consider some literary texts that focus on the effects of technology on humanity: Karel Čapek’s play about artificial humans, RUR (which coined the term “robot”); and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World and William Gibson’s Neuromancer, both of which reconsider what it means to be human in the face of both consciousness-changing technology and free-market capitalism. The relationship between humanity, technology, and capitalism will be further explored in Vonnegut’s satirical Breakfast of Champions and Philip K Dick’s terrifying Ubik. Writing assignments will focus on developing coherent arguments, using a broad range of research tools, and conducting careful analysis of evidence.

CRN11127
ListingENGL 110-L06
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: J.R.R.Tolkien
InstructorJed LaCoste
Time1900 - 2145
DaysM

J.R.R. Tolkien is one of the great writers of the 20th century, & his works are among the greatest achievements in fantasy fiction. We’ll discuss The Lord of the Rings, a text that is familiar due to its incredible cultural impact, as well as a number of shorter writings by Tolkien. By exploring many of the influences and contexts that shape his works, this course seeks to deepen understanding of the complex & dynamic relationship between fantasy & reality in Tolkien’s fiction and in fiction generally.

CRN11128
ListingENGL 110-L07
CourseCritical Reading & Writing II: Modernism and the East
InstructorWilliam Wenaus
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

This course will on focus on texts of the modernist movement, a period in that can be roughly understood as spanning the years between 1890 and 1945, and that can be characterized by substantial stylistic breaks with previous modes of literary expression. Varying definitions of modernism(s) will be key to our class discussions. We will be reading one Western Modernist novel, and a selection of Western Modernist poetry, to observe how these texts represent and engage with the East. We will then read an East Asian Modernist novel and observe how the West is represented and engaged with in the Eastern context as well. Doing so allows the course to engage in a conversation regarding the relationship between Eastern and Western texts of the Modernist movement, and to come to an understanding of how these texts and cultures inform one another.

CRN11145
ListingENGL 252-L01
CourseCreative Writing I
InstructorCredence McFadzean
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

This workshop-based course gives students the opportunity to hone their creative writing skills and interests in a variety of genres, such as short fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Course work will involve exercises geared toward developing particular areas of language, such as imagery, characterization, and narration. Assignments will be workshopped and revised regularly, with class discussion being a major component. The course will culminate in a writing portfolio at the end of term. Whether you are pursuing a career as a writer, or have just started writing creatively, all are welcome!

CRN11150
ListingENGL 304AI-L01
CourseWilliam Blake
InstructorNoel Chevalier
Time1130 - 1245
DaysMW

Poet, artist, engraver, printer, political radical, religious visionary: William Blake's literary and visual works comprise some of the most challenging artistic expressions of the last 200 years. However, studying Blake is well worth the effort. This course will offer an introduction to Blake’s poetry, prose, and paintings, with a view to reaping the rich rewards contained in his poetry and art. We will focus primarily on the Illuminated Books, although we will also read parts of his great unfinished epic, The Four Zoas, and study briefly his later political and theological works. We will not, for reasons of time, study in great detail his theories of art; nor will we delve too deeply into Blake’s theology: our focus here is on Blake as a poet.

CRN11158
ListingENGL 387AE-L01
CourseChildren's Literature
InstructorDorothy Lane
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

Re-experience books you read as children, with an awareness of their character as both literature and cultural artifact. This course is an examination of several well-known books for children and their cinematic counterparts. All of these books focus on human relations with the natural world; all have acquired some measure of world renown; and all have a significant spiritual component. We will explore how each text reflects and is shaped by the culture from which it emerged, and how each is subsequently translated for distinct audiences and for the medium of film.

Geography
CRN11489
ListingGEOG 120-L01
CourseHuman Geography
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time1030 - 1120
DaysMWF

This course introduces the diverse subject matter of human geography. It will discuss the changing approaches to understanding and explaining multiple issues of interest to human geographers, and how the discipline connects with the broad concerns of society.

CRN11499
ListingGEOG 330-L01
CoursePolitical Geography
InstructorLouis Awanyo
Time1230 - 1320
DaysMWF

This course will discuss explanatory frameworks for interpreting both historical and contemporary political geography and provides in-depth insights into some of the most significant political geographic events, such as the Syrian conflict, the extremism of Boko Haram, Colonialism and the New Colonialism, the Cold War, the emerging polycentric world of competition between the Great Powers (e.g. Japan, China, Russia, India, E.U., and U.S.) and implications for world peace and the stability of the world order.

History
CRN11582
ListingHIST 114-L01
CourseIssues in History of Americas
InstructorMarc Patenaude
Time1430 - 1545
DaysTR

This course focuses on the role of empire and imperialism in the development of the Americas from the Pre-Columbian empires that existed prior to European contact, through the European empires of Spain, Britain and France in the 15th to 18th centuries, and ending with American attempts at hegemony during the 19th and 20th centuries. Primary sources and student discussion will help students explore this era in history.

CRN11590
ListingHIST 270-L01
CourseEurope 1400-1648
InstructorClay Burlingham
Time1900 - 2145
DaysT

This course will examine what made the Renaissance possible, as the Humanists who led it looked to give rebirth to the classical world of Greece and Rome. It will look at what made Florence the center of this Renaissance, along with how the discoveries of it not only launched the Age of Discovery, but enabled the emergence of the Nation State. It will look at the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, as well as how the Scientific Revolution, which while growing out of the Renaissance, still came to oppose a fundamental tenet of it, for while the Humanists looked to imitate the Greeks, the Scientific Revolutionaries found flaws in their astronomy.

CRN11595
ListingHIST 290AN-L01
CourseHistory of Africa
InstructorIbio Nzunguba
Time1330 - 1420
DaysMWF

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the history and diverse cultures of Africa from the earliest times up to colonization. Particular attention will be given to the roots of African peoples, processes of regional differentiation, and evolving patterns of trade, politics, and conflict prior to the penetration by the West. Common myths and misconceptions about Africa held in Western countries will be investigated and critiqued. Lastly, the course will focus on the relationships between Africans and others through slavery, exploration, colonization, and religious proselytization.

Interdisciplinary Studies
CRN11621
ListingIDS 101-L01
CourseInterdisciplinary Studies: Contemporary Issues
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

This course will examine various topics of critical interest in the 21st Century, possibly including, but not limited to: religious diversity, social constructions of identity, consumer choices, sustainable livelihoods, and current environmental issues. We will explore ideas about locating ourselves and developing agency in a changing and challenging world. Oral and written communication skills are developed through in-class group work and informal and formal presentations. Coordinated by one faculty member, this course draws on the expertise of instructional faculty from different disciplines. Community service learning through volunteer work (approximately 12 hours for the semester) will complement the academic component of this course.

CRN11622
ListingIDS 290AB-L01 (cross-listed with ANTH 242AG/ANTH 320AL)
CourseInterdisciplinary Studies: Ecomuseums
InstructorGlenn Sutter
Time1900 - 2145
DaysW

This course will explore the history and recent applications of a flexible community development model - the ecomuseum - where heritage is used as a basis for sustainable development. An ecomuseum is a community-driven organization that enables people to explore, interpret and safeguard their shared heritage in a multifaceted and dynamic way. All types of heritage are used as a foundation for activities that are aimed at positive socio-economic outcomes and sustainable livelihoods. This course will study ecomuseums in other parts of the world and participate in the development of an emerging ecomuseum in southern Saskatchewan, working directly with the community. This is a project-based experiential course.

Mathematics
CRN11979
ListingMATH 110-L01
CourseCalculus I
InstructorShuchita Sharma
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

An introductory class in the theory of techniques of differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Topics include limits, optimization, curve sketching and areas.

CRN11980
ListingMATH 110-L10
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time1030 - 1120
DaysM
CRN11995
ListingMATH 111-L01
CourseCalculus II
InstructorVijaya Agasthian
Time1430 - 1545
DaysTR

Inverse Functions; Differentiation and integration of exponential, logarithmic functions and inverse trigonometric functions; methods of integration and applications; indeterminate forms, L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; sequences, series, power series and Taylor series.

CRN11996
ListingMATH 111-L11
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time0930 - 1020
DaysM
CRN12004
ListingMATH 122-L01
CourseLinear Algebra I
InstructorShuchita Sharma
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

An introductory class in elementary linear algebra. Topics include matrices, systems of equations, inverse of a matrix, determinants, vectors, eigenvectors and eigenvalues.

CRN12005
ListingMATH 122-L10
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time1330 - 1420
DaysF
CRN12012
ListingMATH 217-L01
CourseDifferential Equations I
InstructorVijaya Agasthian
Time1430 - 1545
DaysMW

Introduction to differential equations; Solutions to homogeneous and non-homogeneous ordinary differential equations; modelling with differential equations; Laplace transform.

Music & Music History
CRN12098
ListingMUHI 203-L01
CourseMusic History Survey II (Chant to Baroque)
InstructorBarbara Reul
Time1130 - 1220
DaysMWF

In this survey course, we will examine Western Classical art music and its changing role in society. The focus will be on the evolution of style, repertoire, and aesthetics in music from the Middle Ages (Chant) to the late Baroque (J.S. Bach and contemporaries). Students will sharpen a variety of academic skill sets throughout the semester, including listening, writing (with the help of LCUR “Writing Across the Disciplines” Coordinator Professor Scott J. Wilson), and presenting on an assigned topic in class. NOTE: Attendance of concerts is required.

CRN12100
ListingMUHI 418-L01
CourseMusic, Women, Culture
InstructorBarbara Reul
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

The goal of this seminar course is to explore critically what, and question how women have contributed – especially as composers, performers, teachers, listeners, and muses – to musical traditions and cultures of the past and present. Students will hone their oral, listening, and writing skills and prepare a semester-long scholarly journal meant to facilitate new portals of understanding in lieu of tests and exams. NOTE: Attendance of concerts off-campus is required. Non-music majors who wish to take this class as an elective should contact the instructor directly; the completion of MU 100 or MUHI 202 will be an asset.

Nonprofit Sector Leadership & Innovation
CRN12143
ListingNSLI 200-L01
CourseFoundations of the Nonprofit Sector
InstructorCaroline Graves
Time
DaysWeb delivered course with online class meetings

Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector is an introduction to the nonprofit and voluntary sector in Saskatchewan, Canada and the world. It examines theories about why the sector exists, the role it plays in society and contemporary public governance. The course examines the size, scope, and impact of the sector along with various forms and functions of nonprofit and voluntary organizations and accountability in the context of governing and managing a private not-for-profit corporation.

CRN12144
ListingNSLI 310-L01
CourseNonprofit Human Resources
InstructorLoretta Gerlach
Time1900 - 2145
DaysT

A focus on human resources fundamentals and management for both paid staff and volunteers in nonprofits, including recruitment, screening, orientation, evaluation, retention, supervision/mentoring, job descriptions, policies and procedures, records management, communication and recognition, confidentiality, relationships, conflict resolution, and self-care. Labour, human rights, and cultural diversity standards are examined.

CRN12145
ListingNSLI 320-L01
CourseNonprofit Advocacy
Instructor
Time
DaysWeb delivered course with online class meetings

Theoretical and practical considerations of nonprofit advocacy work, including power structures and systems, government structures, community development and organizing, and networking and engaging community residents to achieve changes in public policies and programs to educate about societal problems. Legal restrictions on charities’ advocacy are examined.

CRN12146
ListingNSLI 390AB-L01
CourseManaging Diversity
InstructorStephanie Kohlruss
Time
DaysWeb delivered course with online class meetings

Discover the fundamentals and challenges of fundraising and resource development in non-profit and voluntary sector organizations. Topics include working through the donor cycle, the importance of relationship building, establishing revenue streams, grant writing, and the role of the board and governance for organizational sustainability.

Philosophy
CRN12152
ListingPHIL 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Philosophy
InstructorRoger Petry
Time1130 - 1220
DaysMWF

Philosophy seeks to satisfy our intellectual curiosity about enduring questions: what we can know, what is meaningful, how should we live our lives—all dimensions of the traditional search for wisdom. This course will explore questions concerning knowledge and truth, mind and body, personal identity, free will, morality, politics, and the existence of God. Students will also be introduced to various areas of philosophy including metaphysics, critical thinking, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of religion.

CRN12156
ListingPHIL 150-L01
CourseCritical Thinking
Instructor
Time1600 - 1715
DaysTR
CRN12164
ListingPHIL 282-L01
CoursePhilosophical Issues in Sustainable Development
InstructorRoger Petry
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

Sustainable Development is now central to agendas of the UN (with the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals guiding global development until 2030), Higher Education, leading businesses, government, and non-governmental organizations. But what does it mean? Is it coherent? Can it be done? This course examines sustainability from a philosophical perspective. Defined early on as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs”, the course will seek to clarify its various meanings, their coherence, justifications, implications, and related concepts. Political philosophy, philosophy of economics, and ethics will also be employed. Finally, strategic approaches proposed for achieving sustainability will be considered including institutional change, education, and technological innovation. Where possible, the course will make use of local sustainability issues in examining these philosophical topics.

Psychology
CRN12267
ListingPSYC 101-L01
CourseIntroductory Psychology: Social, Developmental, and Clinical Focus
InstructorIan MacAusland-Berg
Time1300 - 1415
DaysMW

An introduction to the social science aspects of psychology, including the study of adjustment, disorders, development, personality and the social environment of the person.

CRN12295
ListingPSYC 102-L01
CourseIntroductory Psychology: Biological and Cognitive Focus
InstructorKaila Bruer
Time1130 - 1245
DaysMW

This course provides an overview of how psychologists conceptualize and study human behavior using experimental methods. You will learn about various topics including how stress impacts our health, how humans perceive the world around them, how we learn new things, how our brains work, and how emotions drive much of our behavior. This class, together with PSYC 101, provides a general introduction to psychology and human behavior.

CRN12296
ListingPSYC 102-L02
CourseIntroductory Psychology: Biological and Cognitive Focus (JUSTICE & JOURNALISM BUNDLE)
InstructorKaila Bruer
Time1130 - 1245
DaysMW

This course provides an overview of how psychologists conceptualize and study human behavior using experimental methods. You will learn about various topics including how stress impacts our health, how humans perceive the world around them, how we learn new things, how our brains work, and how emotions drive much of our behavior. This class, together with PSYC 101, provides a general introduction to psychology and human behavior.

CRN12303
ListingPSYC 210-L02
CourseLifespan Developmental Psychology
InstructorCharles Hackney
Time1800 - 2045
DaysM

Developmental psychology is the study of processes of change across the lifespan: the interaction between environmental and biological processes, maturational and learning factors, and how these interact with social influences in the developing person. The purpose of this course is to provide a "bird's eye view" of the field by looking at the major theories and some of the major theorists who have contributed the "big ideas" that shape our understanding of the ways in which people grow and develop from womb to tomb.

CRN12306
ListingPSYC 220-L01
CourseSocial Psychology
InstructorSusan Weir
Time1330 - 1420
DaysMWF

Social Psychology is the scientific study of the feelings, thoughts and behaviours of individuals in social settings. We will explore topics such as social cognition, social perception, social influence, self, attitudes/prejudice/discrimination, groups, prosocial behaviour, aggression, love and relationships, ending with a look at how all of these contribute to behaviours in those who join cults and/or gangs.

CRN12308
ListingPSYC 230-L01
CoursePersonality Psychology
InstructorCarole Eaton
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

Society is intrigued with how people’s personality is manifest in their behaviour. Through introspective self-reflection and the use of critical thinking skills, this class will examine questions such as: How do we explain behaviour? What motivates us? Are there barriers to being who we really are? Are we the product of our past? Our genetics? Evolution? How do culture, family, and experience affect who we are? How do you become the best version of yourself? Can your personality change over time, or is personality fixed from the start? What is the difference between “normal” and “abnormal” personality? The overarching goal of this class is for students to gain knowledge and insight that will prove useful in real life situations, specifically your own personal and professional relationships.

CRN12314
ListingPSYC 321-L01
CourseForensic Psychology
InstructorKaila Bruer
Time1430 - 1715
DaysW

This course is an introduction to forensic psychology. It focuses on how psychology can be used to understand the behavior of those involved in the justice system. It includes topics such as psychology of police investigations, deception, eyewitness testimony, child victims and witnesses, juries, mental illness in court, sexual offenders, psychopathy, and risk assessment. In this class, you will gain experiencing connecting psychology research with real criminal cases in Canada.

CRN12315
ListingPSYC 333-L01
CourseAbnormal Psychology
InstructorIan MacAusland-Berg
Time1900 - 2145
DaysW

A comparative study of the nature and development of normal and disordered patterns of personality and behaviour.

CRN12318
ListingPSYC 388AB-L01
CoursePositive Psychology
InstructorSusan Weir
Time1800 - 2045
DaysT

Positive psychology is the scientific and practical exploration of human strengths. In this introduction to positive psychology course, we will begin by exploring both historical and philosophical foundations of this discipline; it will be didactic and interactive. Areas of focus will include: well-being, virtues and values, strengths, happiness, optimism, gratitude, empathy, mindfulness, self-determination, wisdom, and clinical application.

Religious Studies
CRN12396
ListingRLST 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Religious Studies
InstructorMichelle Folk
Time1030 - 1120
DaysMWF

Religion is an important part of human experience that explains how the universe was created and our place in it. While religion answers questions about existence, it also shapes our daily lives - what we wear, eat, and do every day. This course introduces you to the academic study of religion/spirituality and explores the beliefs and practices of traditions such as Buddhism, Daoism, Christianity, Hinduism, Indigenous traditions, and Sikhism to better understand religions/spiritualities in Canada and around the world. We will also study the body, colonialism, gender, and society in relation to religion with the goal of developing an understanding of lived religion and an appreciation for religious and cultural diversity.

CRN12397
ListingRLST 100-L02
CourseIntroduction to Religious Studies
InstructorMichelle Folk
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

Religion is an important part of human experience that explains how the universe was created and our place in it. While religion answers questions about existence, it also shapes our daily lives - what we wear, eat, and do every day. This course introduces you to the academic study of religion/spirituality and explores the beliefs and practices of traditions such as Buddhism, Daoism, Christianity, Hinduism, Indigenous traditions, and Sikhism to better understand religions/spiritualities in Canada and around the world. We will also study the body, colonialism, gender, and society in relation to religion with the goal of developing an understanding of lived religion and an appreciation for religious and cultural diversity.

CRN12401
ListingRLST 288-L01
CourseChristianity
InstructorMichelle Wagner
Time1430 - 1545
DaysTR

“I don’t mean to toot my own horn, but if Jesus Christ lived in Chicago today, and he had come to me and he had five thousand dollars, let’s just say things would have turned out differently.” Do Mr. Billy Flynn’s words from the satirical musical Chicago make you take pause? Do you have no idea what the punchline is? If you answered yes to either question, then this is the course for you. Delving into various historical manifestations of Christianity(s), throughout our course, we will note the complex interplay of political and social factors shaping Christianity’s persona.

CRN12402
ListingRLST 245-L01
CourseBible: Old Testament/Tanakh
InstructorVolker Greifenhagen
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

In this course, we will study what is known to Christians as the Old Testament, to Jews as the Tanak, and to scholars as the Hebrew Bible. We will discover this book to be many things: a collection of historical documents, a literary compilation, and a conversation partner, or revelation, on deep societal and spiritual issues, such as identity, family, gender, ethnicity, politics, and ideas about God. You can expect careful reading of biblical texts with attention to historical origins and context, translation, literary structure and interpretation.

CRN12404
ListingRLST 290AK-L01
CourseThe Qur'an in English
InstructorVolker Greifenhagen
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

The Qur’an is the holy book of Muslims. Following an academic approach, we will explore the content and literary style of the Qur’an in the context of its emergence in Late Antiquity. We will read parts of the Qur’an in various English translations. Sometimes we will also read parallel texts belonging to other religious groups explicitly mentioned in the Qur’an, such as Jews and Christians. We will encounter the scholarly challenges of studying the different layers and genres of the text, identifying its audience and various themes, and dealing with the limits of translation and the variety of interpretations.

CRN12405
ListingRLST 290AP-L01 (cross-listed with WGST 280AK-L01)
CourseSex & Sexualities in Religion
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1430 - 1715
DaysR

Religious teachings on sexual practices, desires and orientations have regulated social norms and notions of morality. Examining a number of religious traditions, historical moments and current religious, feminist and queer movements, this course invites students to discern tropes and potentiality within the larger discourse of personal agency and social power.

Sociology
CRN12427
ListingSOC 211-L01
CourseEthnic and Cultural Diversity
InstructorLori Walker
Time1430 - 1715
DaysT

This course introduces students to sociological analyses and theories of ethnic and cultural diversity, with an emphasis on contemporary Canada. Specific topics might include Aboriginal cultures in Canadian society, issues arising from conflicts between concepts of human rights and specific cultural practices, overt and systemic racism, and controversies about immigration.

CRN12429
ListingSOC 212-L01
CourseGender and Sexuality
InstructorJeffrey Walters
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

This course introduces students to sociological perspectives on gender in contemporary society. The course covers aspects of recent research and of current debates on femininity and masculinity, and provides a brief introduction to some classic and contemporary theoretical perspectives on gender. Gender is a complex and multi-dynamic topic with many themes and theories attached to it. Further, students will be exposed to the concept that gender is not a “woman focused” theme but does include stereotypes and caricatures of “men” as well. Society and its structures perpetuate these both implicitly and explicitly, for good reasons and not so good reasons.

Women's & Gender Studies
CRN12752
ListingWGST 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Women's and Gender Studies
InstructorJeffrey Walters
Time1430 - 1520
DaysMWF

Class members will become familiar with the main debates and concerns in both feminism and the discipline. It will quickly become evident that issues pertaining to women and gender are never limited to the analysis of gender considerations but are always connected to many factors including race, class, colonialism, sexual orientation, and abilities (and that Women’s and Gender Studies might not just be about women).We will stress crucial vocabulary and key terms that are used in the discipline and introduce major areas of study, which can each be pursued as courses unto themselves at the senior level.

CRN12757
ListingWGST 206-L01
CourseFeminism & Activism
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1130 - 1415
DaysF

How do feminist principles translate into political action, public policy, organizational structures, artistic or religious movements, or into responding to the 94 Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission? Through historic, global and local stories, ranging from the literary, the experiential and community leaders in the classroom, this course engages students in practical, hands-on application of theory in action.

CRN12758
ListingWGST 280AK-L01 (cross-listed with RLST 290AP-L01)
CourseSex & Sexualities in Religion
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1430 - 1715
DaysR

Religious teachings on sexual practices, desires and orientations have regulated social norms and notions of morality. Examining a number of religious traditions, historical moments and current religious, feminist and queer movements, this course invites students to discern tropes and potentiality within the larger discourse of personal agency and social power.