Current Semester

Did You Know?

  • Our student residence, The Student Village at Luther College, is a great place for student athletes to call home. The U of R Kinesiology Building is footsteps away with its Olympic size pool, gymnasium, and health centre.

  • Luther College is recognized for its high standards of teaching, focused research, and one-on-one academic advising. We value and protect this heritage of excellence in scholarship, freedom of inquiry, and faithful seeking after truth.

  • Luther College students are U of R students and receive all the same benefits. Upon graduation you will receive a U of R degree.

  • Living in The Student Village at Luther College, our student residence, comes with a choice of healthy, nutritious meal plans. That means no grocery shopping, no meals to cook, and no dirty dishes to worry about. You can focus on your studies and wellness!

  • Wondering where to live? Our student residence, The Student Village at Luther College, is considered the best choice for first-year student accommodation. Individual private rooms mean you can stick to your own schedule and you never have to deal with roommate hassles.

  • Luther College students are eligible for an additional $100,000 in academic awards – in addition to scholarships and bursaries awarded by the U of R.

  • Luther College offers Bundles programs that group together first-year students and classes to give you a great start and help ease the transition from high school to university.

  • Luther College students can sign up for the UR Guarantee program - get a job guaranteed after you graduate.

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Current Semester Luther Courses

Art & Art History
CRN10081
ListingART 290AC-L01
CourseIntroduction to Graphic Design
InstructorAnnalisa Raho
Time0830 - 1115
DaysM

Graphic design surrounds us and we are exposed to a diverse range of messages through various media. What rules do the designers follow? How do they strategize their projects to guide the viewer’s perception? Through a combination of studio projects and lectures, you will explore principles of visual strategies and perception applied to design composition. By actively engaging with sketches, models, and outlines of existing projects, we will explore fundamental elements of the design composition such as alignment, proportion, visual weight, and color. Furthermore, we will design new projects as if they were realized in a professional environment.

CRN10118
ListingARTH 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Art History
InstructorBarbara Meneley
Time1900 - 2015
DaysTR

Art History 100 is an introductory survey of world art and visual culture throughout human history. Through readings, discussions, lectures, and artwork analysis students will investigate historical and cultural contexts and the various roles of artists and viewers. Students will build a foundation for the consideration, identification, and understanding of art and visual culture in historical contexts.

Biology
CRN10178
ListingBIOL 140-L06
CourseHuman Biology for Non-majors (TAUGHT IN FRENCH)
InstructorFidji Gendron
Time1230 - 1320
DaysMWF

Plus lab section L07. An introductory level course covering the principles of biology with examples taken from humans.

CRN10179
ListingBIOL 140-L07
CourseLAB (TAUGHT IN FRENCH)
InstructorFidji Gendron
Time1800 - 2045
DaysW
CRN10180
ListingBIOL 140-L98
CourseHuman Biology for Non-majors
InstructorLaura Ambrose
TimeWEB
Days

Plus lab section L99. An introductory course studying the foundation, unifying theories of biology, with examples from humans. This is an asynchronous course with a weekly schedule of units or labs. There are no required video meetings and there are no proctored exams. This is a zero-cost materials course.

CRN10181
ListingBIOL 140-L99
CourseLAB
InstructorLaura Ambrose
TimeWEB
Days
CRN10188
ListingBIOL 224-L01
CourseIntro Medical Microbiology
InstructorNicole Hansmeier
Time1800 - 1915
DaysTR

Plus lab section L02 or L03. This course provides an overview of different important human infectious diseases and the invisible battle between our immune system and diverse pathogens. Using case studies, we will discuss vectors of transmission, distribution and epidemiology, diagnostics, pathophysiology and clinical manifestations, treatment as well as prevention and control options of different diseases.

CRN10189
ListingBIOL 224-L02
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time1430 - 1715
DaysW
CRN10190
ListingBIOL 224-L03
CourseLAB
Instructor
Time0830 - 1115
DaysR
CRN10196
ListingBIOL 303-L01
CourseMedical Microbiology
InstructorNicole Hansmeier
Time1130 - 1245
DaysWF

The intent of this course is to provide an advanced introduction to pathogens and the concept of diseases. This course will showcase the nature of host-pathogen interactions, the intricate nature of pathomechanisms as well as the ongoing arms race between pathogens and their hosts. At the end of this course you will be familiar with pathogenic strategies to evade or overpower the human immune system.

Creative Technologies
CRN10642
ListingCTCH 215-L01
CourseVisual Identity Design
InstructorAnnalisa Raho
Time0830 - 1115
DaysW

Visual Identity is the key to make a difference, and designing a visual identity means making a brand recognizable. In this course you will engage with logo design and all the pertinent visual expressions of corporate design. Through a combination of studio projects and lectures, you will explore principles of visual languages and perception applied to design composition. Experiential learning processes, guest designers, and possibility a tour to an advertising agency will give you a first-hand experience of the real professional environment. Experience the profession through projects that will become great additions to your visual portfolio!

English
CRN11101
ListingENGL 100-L01
CourseCritical Reading and Writing I
InstructorJed LaCoste
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connections between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11102
ListingENGL 100-L02
CourseCritical Reading and Writing I
InstructorCredence McFadzean
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

This course develops students' proficiency in critical reading and writing through the study of a wide range of non-literary and literary texts, and the study of composition, with emphasis on connections between modes of reading and writing.

CRN11127
ListingENGL 110-L01
CourseCritical Reading and Writing II: Literature of Contagion
InstructorBenjamin Salloum
Time1430 - 1545
DaysMW

This course examines the literary treatment of contagion as a private experience, a social phenomenon, and a metaphor. Using Camus’s foundational text "The Plague", the course will consider how contemporary writers in various genres have used disease, plague, and contagion, both literally and figuratively, to explore a wide range of political, social, and emotional experiences. Central to our analysis of these texts will be how successive writers demonstrate an awareness of classic texts in a genre that complicates their treatment of a subject matter. Against the backdrop of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the course will also consider how contemporary writing of the last decade or so has reflected, contextualized, and in some ways anticipated the global health crisis.

CRN11128
ListingENGL 110-L02
CourseCritical Reading and Writing II: Transgressive Fiction
InstructorScott Wilson
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

For Dr. Jesse Kavadlo, reading transgressive fiction is “like having your eyes rubbed raw with broken glass.” So, authors in this genre use shocking characters and themes to question societal and artistic norms. We will focus on cults, consumption, and cleanliness, all of which relate to the absurd, often dangerous, plans characters implement to try to find contentment. Through Chuck Palahniuk (Fight Club), Katherine Dunn (Geek Love), Alissa Nutting (Unclean Jobs for Women and Girls) and others, we will discover that this genre, while controversial at times, often involves not-so-shocking motivations like the quest for acceptance, recognition, and love.

CRN11129
ListingENGL 110-L03
CourseCritical Reading and Writing II: J.R.R. Tolkien
InstructorJed LaCoste
Time1330 - 1420
DaysMWF

J.R.R. Tolkien is one of the great writers of the 20th century, & his works are among the greatest achievements in fantasy fiction. We’ll discuss "The Lord of the Rings", a text that is familiar due to its incredible cultural impact, as well as a number of shorter writings by Tolkien. By exploring many of the influences and contexts that shape his works, this course seeks to deepen understanding of the complex & dynamic relationship between fantasy & reality in Tolkien’s fiction and in fiction generally.

CRN11130
ListingENGL 110-L04
CourseCritical Reading and Writing II: Media & Misinformation
InstructorMichael Horacki
Time1030 - 1120
DaysMWF

This asynchronous course will focus on literature that explores the troubled relationship between mass media and objective reality. To that end, we will study a variety of texts – including works as diverse as George Orwell essays; novels by Hunter S. Thompson and Evelyn Waugh; and episodes from the first season of Matthew Weiner’s long-form television series, Mad Men. Through such texts, we will approach representations of what Stephen Colbert refers to as “truthiness” in the context of totalitarian and dystopian history, the gossip column, Gonzo journalism, the newsroom, and advertising.

CRN11131
ListingENGL 110-L05
CourseCritical Reading and Writing II: Engineering Souls: Biology, Technology, and Humanity (ENGLISH/SCIENCE BUNDLE)
InstructorNoel Chevalier
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

Must also register in BIOL 101-002 and CHEM 105-002. Although this course is a self-contained unit, in many ways it continues directly from the English/Science ENGL100 course. Composition is now focused on research and writing of longer papers; the literature component builds on themes introduced in the Fall semester. This semester, we will consider some literary texts that focus on the effects of technology on humanity: Karel Čapek’s play about artificial humans, "RUR" (which coined the term “robot”); and Aldous Huxley’s "Brave New World" and William Gibson’s "Neuromancer", both of which reconsider what it means to be human in the face of both consciousness-changing technology and free-market capitalism. The relationship between humanity, technology, and capitalism will be further explored in Vonnegut’s satirical "Breakfast of Champions" and Philip K Dick’s terrifying "Ubik". Writing assignments will focus on developing coherent arguments, using a broad range of research tools, and conducting careful analysis of evidence.

CRN11132
ListingENGL 110-L06
CourseCritical Reading and Writing II: Children's Fantasy Literature
InstructorKathryn MacLennan
Time1900 - 2145
DaysM

Did you love the Harry Potter series and want to read more books like it? If so, this class is for you! We will study "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone", "The Golden Compass" by Philip Pullman, and "The Book of Three" by Lloyd Alexander. We will look at the mythological elements used in the novels, particularly the idea of an archetypal hero, as well as how these novels fit into a tradition of children's literature.

CRN11140
ListingENGL 213-L01
CourseSurvey of Canadian Literature
InstructorDorothy Lane
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

This course surveys Canadian literature in English from pre-Confederation to the present, examining issues of national and regional definition. Reading a range of poetry, short fiction, non-fiction, and novels, we will pay particular attention to historical, geographical, and cultural contexts; we will also examine some of the issues regarding national and regional definition. How do our definitions of Canada, and of Canadian literature, include and exclude certain peoples and writers?

CRN11158
ListingENGL 377AA-L01
CourseEighteenth-Century Comedy
InstructorNoel Chevalier
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

One of the chief delights of eighteenth-century literature is its stage comedy. Beginning with the sparkling wit and outrageous sexual situations of Restoration plays, and ending with the simple but perceptive stories of middle-class families at the end the period, these highly readable, amusing plays are also important commentaries on the social, political, and sexual codes that dominated English culture in the eighteenth century. We will also look at these plays in the context of the theatres where they were first presented: how these plays formed part of an "evening's entertainment" that included music, dancing, novelty acts, and especially short plays called “afterpieces”—the eighteenth-century equivalent of today's TV situation comedies. The course is a comprehensive study of the fascinating study of the world of eighteenth-century theatre, and of the men and women who wrote the first modern comedies.

Geography
CRN11500
ListingGEOG 100-L01
CourseWorld Regional Geography
InstructorAna Hidalgo
Time1430 - 1520
DaysMTR

This course introduces the major geographical and cultural regions of the world. It analyses the interactions, patterns, global issues, barriers and potentials between and within regions. Along with the various topics, it explores the human and physical interactions and characteristics of the regions concerning their environmental, cultural and sustainable development.

CRN11502
ListingGEOG 120-L01
CourseHuman Geography
InstructorAna Hidalgo
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

This course introduces the diverse subject matter of human geography. It will discuss the changing approaches to understanding and explaining multiple issues of interest to human geographers and how the discipline connects with the broad concerns of society. Analysis of where people live and why, how the things we use everyday interact with different places, cultures and people and the economic, social and environmental consequences are explored throughout the course.

History
CRN11596
ListingHIST 115-L01
CourseIssues in European History
InstructorClay Burlingham
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

This course will begin with the Intellectual Revolution (the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment--1543-1789) that made possible the French Revolution (1789-1815), and it will end with the fall of Hitler, the rise of Stalin, and the emergence of the Cold War. It will trace the Unification of Italy and Germany, the resultant polarization of Europe, and the escalation of tension, until its explosion in World War I (1914-1918). It will look at the unsettled, yet paradoxically euphoric 1920s, the development of fascism and the advent of communism. It will examine what led to World War II (1939-1945), and how the war in the West so contrasted with the one in the East, as well as how the Cold War issued forth from Stalin's refusal to set free the very countries he had just freed from Nazi control.

Interdisciplinary Studies
CRN11627
ListingIDS 101-L01
CourseInterdisciplinary Studies
InstructorLaura Ambrose
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

This course will examine various topics of critical interest in the 21st Century, including, but also not limited to: discourse on social media, witch hunts, the concept of other, and masculinity studies. We will explore ideas about locating ourselves and developing agency in a changing and challenging world. A major goal of the course is leadership evelopment and to develop solutions to social issues using the framework of the Social Change Model of Leadership Development. Coordinated by one faculty member, this course draws on the expertise of instructional faculty from different disciplines. This course will have some required video meetings, no proctored exams, and is a zero-cost materials course.

CRN13453
ListingIDS 290AB-L01
CourseEcomuseums: Community Engagement for Sustainability
InstructorGlenn Sutter
Time1900 - 2015
DaysTR

Cross-listed with: ANTH 242AG, ANTH 320AL, and GEOG 297AB. This course will explore the history and recent applications of a flexible community development model - the ecomuseum - where heritage is used as a basis for sustainable development. An ecomuseum is a community-driven organization that enables people to explore, interpret and safeguard their shared heritage in a multifaceted and dynamic way. All types of heritage are used as a foundation for activities that are aimed at positive socio-economic outcomes and sustainable livelihoods. This course will study ecomuseums in other parts of the world and participate in the development of an emerging ecomuseum in southern Saskatchewan, working directly with the community. This is a project-based experiential course.

Mathematics
CRN12002
ListingMATH 110-L01
CourseCalculus I
InstructorShuchita Sharma
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

Plus lab section L10. One of the great mathematical advances of all time, calculus has broad applicability across disciplines. This introductory calculus class covers the theory and techniques of differentiation and integration of algebraic and triogonometric functions. Topics include limits, optimization, curve sketching, and calculation of areas.

CRN12003
ListingMATH 110-L10
CourseLAB
InstructorShuchita Sharma
Time0930 - 1020
DaysF
CRN12018
ListingMATH 111-L01
CourseCalculus II
InstructorShuchita Sharma
Time1430 - 1545
DaysTR

Plus lab section L11. Inverse Functions; Differentiation and integration of exponential, logarithmic functions and inverse trigonometric functions; methods of integration and applications; indeterminate forms, L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; sequences, series, power series and Taylor series.

CRN12019
ListingMATH 111-L11
CourseLAB
InstructorShuchita Sharma
Time1030 - 1120
DaysF
CRN12032
ListingMATH 217-L01
CourseDifferential Equations I
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time1000 - 1115
DaysMW

Introduction to differential equations; Solutions to homogeneous and non-homogeneous ordinary differential equations; modelling with differential equations; Laplace transform.

CRN12047
ListingMATH 481-L01
CoursePartial Differential Equations
InstructorIqbal Husain
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

Classification and basic properties of partial differential equations, separation of variables, Fourier series, Sturm-Liouville theory, Fourier and Laplace transforms will be examined.

Music & Music History
CRN12124
ListingMUHI 203-L01
CourseMusic History Survey II (Antiquity to Baroque)
InstructorTrent Leipert
Time1030 - 1120
DaysMWF

In this survey course, we will examine Western Classical art music and its changing role in society. The focus will be on the evolution of style, repertoire, and aesthetics in music from Antiquity to the late Baroque (J.S. Bach and contemporaries). Students will sharpen a variety of academic skill sets throughout the semester, including listening, writing (with the help of LCUR “Writing Across the Disciplines” Coordinator Professor Scott J. Wilson), and presenting on an assigned topic in class.

CRN13321
ListingMUHI 416AB-L01
Course19th Century Instrumental Genres
InstructorTrent Leipert
Time1230 - 1320
DaysMWF

This course explores topics related to instrumental music in the Romantic era. Representative genres, composers, works and their respective historical contexts will be examined. For more information, consult the Music Department. ***Prerequisite: MUHI 203 or permission of the department head.***

Nonprofit Sector Leadership & Innovation
CRN12154
ListingNSLI 100-L01
CourseFoundations of the Nonprofit Sector
InstructorCaroline Graves
TimeWEB
Days

Foundations of the Nonprofit Sector is an introduction to the nonprofit and voluntary sector in Saskatchewan, Canada and the world. It examines theories about why the sector exists, the role it plays in society and contemporary public governance. The course examines the size, scope, and impact of the sector along with various forms and functions of nonprofit and voluntary organizations and accountability in the context of governing and managing a private not-for-profit corporation.

CRN12155
ListingNSLI 220-L01
CourseNonprofit Advocacy & Community Development
InstructorJose Sousa
TimeWEB
Days

Theoretical and practical considerations of nonprofit advocacy work, including power structures and systems, government structures, community development and organizing, and networking and engaging community residents to achieve changes in public policies and programs to educate about societal problems. Legal restrictions on charities’ advocacy are examined.

CRN12156
ListingNSLI 350-L01
CourseNonprofit Finance/Philanthropy
InstructorKathleen Wilde
TimeWEB
Days

Financial management and philanthropy, focusing on diverse funding sources and formulas: governments, donors, corporate sponsorships, fundraising, social enterprise, etc. Introduction to financial monitoring systems, roles in nonprofit organizations, creating and monitoring annual budgets, internal and external reports and procedures, cost accounting methods, long range financial planning, building capacity for innovation.

Philosophy
CRN12162
ListingPHIL 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Philosophy
InstructorRoger Petry
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

Philosophy seeks to satisfy our intellectual curiosity about enduring questions: what we can know, what is meaningful, how should we live our lives—all dimensions of the traditional search for wisdom. This course will explore questions concerning knowledge and truth, mind and body, personal identity, free will, morality, politics, and the existence of God. Students will also be introduced to various areas of philosophy including metaphysics, critical thinking, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and philosophy of religion.

CRN12166
ListingPHIL 150-L01
CourseCritical Thinking
InstructorDustin Olson
Time0830 - 0945
DaysTR

Critical thinking - also called logic - is the study of how to distinguish good reasoning from bad, correct thinking from incorrect. It's a little like grammar: we use it all the time, usually without thinking about it. But like grammar, critical thinking involves universal rules that you may not be familiar with. Studying these rules will help you to use them more effectively, and so to become a better thinker.

CRN12172
ListingPHIL 277-L01
CourseEthical Issues in Science & Technology
InstructorRoger Petry
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

Should corporations and governments be further regulated to restrict their gathering, exchange, and use of personal data? Should government research be freely available to citizens, commercialized, or left up to the private sector? Should genetically modified foods be labelled? Are technological solutions to pressing environmental problems such as climate change our best approach? How should science be directed and governed? This course uses a variety of case studies to examine ethical issues brought about by science and technology. Topic areas include the place of science and technology in society, its role in enhancing or restricting human freedoms, attempts to own and control technology (for example, through intellectual property rights), environmental risks and opportunities associated with specific technologies, the ethical status of machines (can machines be conscious?), and the ethics of technologically enhancing human beings.

CRN12227
ListingPPE 200-001
CourseFoundations of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics
InstructorRoger Petry, Carmen Dybwad, and Tom McIntosh
Time1300 - 1415
DaysTR

This inter-disciplinary course focuses on a set of challenging contemporary issues and examines how they can be approached by each of the three disciplines of philosophy, politics, and economics. Emphasis is placed on the differences between these approaches, and on understandings that emerge only through combining them. The course is team taught by three instructors (one from each discipline) to ensure lively, interactive discussions. Course assignments provide real-world training for those seeking to work in organizational settings such as business and government.

Psychology
CRN12267
ListingPSYC 101-L01
CourseIntroductory Psychology: Social, Developmental, and Clinical Focus
InstructorIan MacAusland-Berg
Time1130 - 1245
DaysTR

An introduction to the social science aspects of psychology, including the study of adjustment, disorders, development, personality and the social environment of the person.

CRN12300
ListingPSYC 210-L01
CourseLifespan Developmental Psychology
InstructorSusan Weir
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

A study of developmental processes across the lifespan; the interaction between environmental and biological processes; maturational and learning factors; how these interact with social influences in the developing person.

CRN12303
ListingPSYC 220-L01
CourseSocial Psychology
InstructorAlexis Zederayko
Time1130 - 1220
DaysMWF

Social psychology, the study of human behaviour in its social context, deals with the way we think socially, the impressions we form of others, and emphasizes the influence of group membership and interactions. Learn about: cognition, perception, the self, propaganda, prejudice, discrimination, prosocial behaviour, aggression, love, charismatic leaders, and cults. Take a glimpse into our social world and how these various concepts relate to everyday interactions!

CRN12306
ListingPSYC 230-L01
CoursePersonality Psychology
InstructorIan MacAusland-Berg
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

An integrative course examining various perspectives on the study of the person.

CRN12318
ListingPSYC 388AB-L01
CoursePositive Psychology
InstructorSusan Weir
Time1800 - 2045
DaysM

Positive psychology is the scientific and practical exploration of human strengths. In this introduction to positive psychology course, we will begin by exploring both historical and philosophical foundations of this discipline; it will be didactic and interactive. Areas of focus will include: well-being, virtues and values, strengths, happiness, optimism, gratitude, empathy, mindfulness, self-determination, wisdom, and clinical application.

Religious Studies
CRN12375
ListingRLST 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Religious Studies
InstructorMichelle Folk
Time1130 - 1220
DaysMWF

Religion is an important part of human experience that explains how the universe was created and our place in it. While religion answers questions about existence, it also shapes our daily lives - what we wear, eat, and do every day.We will study the body, colonialism, gender, and society in relation to religion with the goal of developing an understanding of lived religion and an appreciation for religious and cultural diversity.

CRN12377
ListingRLST 228-L01
CourseChristianity
InstructorMichelle Wagner
Time1430 - 1545
DaysTR

Through a completely asynchronous teaching approach, we will begin our course discussing key foundations of Christianity, its religious paraphernalia, focusing on various historical manifestations of Christianity(s) in the context of political and societal developments. Dotting our i’s and (‘religiously’ and ‘historically’) crossing our t’s, we will turn our discussion to contemporary issues. Throughout our course, from the Alpha to the Omega, we will have a continual Revelation concerning the complex interplay of historical, political and social factors that have (and continue to) shape Christianity’s persona.

CRN12381
ListingRLST 290BB-L01
CourseReligion Spirituality & Health
InstructorVolker Greifenhagen
Time0930 - 1020
DaysMWF

If you are considering a career in a healthcare related profession, or are personally interested, this course will help you to determine how religion/spirituality relates to health, potentially providing an asset for healthcare and sometimes a challenge. We will explore beliefs and practices regarding health, disease, healing and mortality in a variety of religious/spiritual traditions from around the world, and examine how these affect, positively and negatively, both individual and community health. We will consider empirical studies of religion and health outcomes, and ask what kind of place, if any, religious or spiritual considerations should have in the delivery of modern health care, in the practice of doctors and other health care specialists and workers, and in government health care policy. The present global pandemic will provide a contemporary and vivid focus for our investigation of these topics. Prerequisite: Completion of 12 credit hours or RLST 100 or permission of the department head.

CRN12382
ListingRLST 341-L01
CourseModern Islam
InstructorVolker Greifenhagen
Time1130 - 1220
DaysMWF

In this course, we will explore the religious expressions and concerns of Muslims today. We will take note of significant movements, persons and influences affecting various Muslim communities, and sample some of the rich geographical, cultural and religious diversity of the contemporary Muslim world. We will focus on the situation of Muslim communities and populations in the “West”, especially in Canada, and on the dynamics of contemporary Muslim discourses around media and representation, secularism and globalism, violence and extremism, law and accommodation, gender roles and sexuality, and, in the context of the present global pandemic, beliefs and practices regarding health, disease, healing and mortality. Prerequisites: Completion of 24 credit hours or a 200 level RLST course or permission of the department head.

CRN12384
ListingRLST 390BX-L01
CourseMulticulturalism and Religious Literacy
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1430 - 1715
DaysM

What role, if any, does religion play in the public space in a secular country? Is religion a purely private matter, and what does that mean in our understanding of history, society, cultural practices, epistemology and ontology, gender roles, rituals and ceremonies, or even politics? How might we equip ourselves to understand current issues like QAnon and misinformation about politics or anti-masking, Islamophobia, extreme religious radicalism and its impact on politics, Quebec’s banning of religious symbols sans the crucifix, questions concerning sexual orientation and human rights…the list goes on. If you imagine yourself a critical thinker, savvy with the world, you need to understand how “religion” is part of this world. Tools of religious literacy, understandings of multiculturalism and secularism, and models of interreligious dialogue that include all, even (!) atheists, will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on our Canadian context of colonialism and the current discourse on decolonization and reconciliation.

Sociology
CRN12409
ListingSOC 211-L01
CourseEthics and Cultural Diversity
InstructorLori Walker
Time1030 - 1120
DaysMWF

This course introduces students to sociological analyses and theories of ethnic and cultural diversity, with an emphasis on contemporary Canada. Specific topics might include Aboriginal cultures in Canadian society, issues arising from conflicts between concepts of human rights nd specific cultural practices, overt and systemic racism, and controversies about immigration.

Statistics
CRN12505
ListingSTAT 100-L01
CourseElementary Statistics for Applications
InstructorVijaya Agasthian
Time1430 - 1545
DaysMW

An introduction to statistical methods; descriptive statistics; the normal distribution; basic techniques of statistical inference; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for population means and proportions; simple linear regression; and one-way analysis of variance.

CRN12506
ListingSTAT 100-L02
CourseElementary Statistics for Applications
InstructorVijaya Agasthian
Time1000 - 1115
DaysTR

An introduction to statistical methods; descriptive statistics; the normal distribution; basic techniques of statistical inference; confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for population means and proportions; simple linear regression; and one-way analysis of variance.

CRN12513
ListingSTAT 200-L01
CourseIntermediate Statistics for Applications
InstructorVijaya Agasthian
Time1130 - 1245
DaysMW

A continuation of STAT 100; inference for two categorical variables; basic multiple linear regression; two-way analysis of variance; introduction to nonparametric methods; statistical process control; introduction to survey design.

Women's & Gender Studies
CRN12742
ListingWGST 100-L01
CourseIntroduction to Women's and Gender Studies
InstructorJeffrey Walters
Time1030 - 1120
DaysMWF

This course will examine the historical development of feminism and women's studies. Women's representation in academic practice will be analyzed using examples from humanities, the arts, and social sciences. Strategies for change and for the empowerment of women will be considered.

CRN12775
ListingWGST 300-L01
CourseMissing and Murdered Indigenous Women
InstructorBrenda Anderson
Time1430 - 1715
DaysR

Over a year has passed since the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada concluded. Over 231 imperative changes were called for by the commissioners, yet what, if anything has changed? This class responds to the inquiry by addressing the historical and present-day context for violence against Indigenous women in colonized countries, particularly noting the systemic reasons for racialized and sexualized violence against Indigenous women in Canada, Mexico, the U.S., Guatemala and Australia. Drawing on the experiences of community workers, family members, policy workers, police, media, spiritual leaders, academics and activists, this course requests us all to contextualize the problem and advocate for the solutions, especially focusing on the resiliency and leadership of Indigenous women leaders. The course is specifically designed to address the question of how we study traumatic topics and care for ourselves and for one another at the same time. You are invited to this course if you are serious about becoming part of the solution.