Mark Anderson

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Dr. Mark Anderson
LC 222
306.585.5046
mark.anderson@uregina.ca


Dr. Mark Cronlund Anderson was born in Minneapolis, raised in Kenora, Ontario, and earned a Ph.D. in Latin American History from the University of California in 1995. He taught at Brock University for six years and then joined Luther College in 2002. He has published five books, including Pancho Villa’s Revolution by Headlines (2001) and Cowboy Imperialism and Hollywood Film (2007), which won the 2010 Cawelti Prize for the best book in American culture awarded by the Popular Culture Association and American Culture Association. His most recent study (co-authored with Dr. Carmen Robertson), Seeing Red, A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers, won three 2012 Saskatchewan Book Awards including best scholarly work. His forthcoming 2016 book is titled Holy War: Cowboys, Indians, and 9/11s. He teaches courses that explore revolutions in Latin America, American film and history, imperialism in the Americas, the history of cowboys, and a course assessing the significance of 9/11. Dr. Anderson and his family like to travel and love the out of doors—canoe tripping, hiking, mountain biking, fishing, and the company of their irrepressible labradoodle.

 

Courses Taught

HIST 112 – Modern Latin American Revolutions
HIST 239 – History of the Cowboy
HIST 245 – History of Modern Mexico
HIST 348 – History of Imperialism in the Americas
HIST 339 – Many 9/11s?
HIST 435/835 – The Frontier in American Film

 

Current Research and Community Work

  • Ongoing work on a comparative study that explores how the printed press in North America imagines Aboriginal peoples
  • Book project that explores post-9/11 zombie films
  • ESL tutor at the Regina Public Library
  • Editorial board member, West-East Institute, Istanbul, Turkey

 

Recent Grants and Awards

2015, Visiting Professor, Jilin University, China

2015, University of Regina Humanities Institute Research Fellow

2014, PRF Grant, Luther College, $5,000

2012, Winner of three Saskatchewan Book Awards for Seeing Red, A History of Natives in Canadian Newspapers

2010, Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Research Grant, $50,000

2010, Winner of the Cawelti Award for the best book in American History, presented by the Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association,
for Cowboy Imperialism and Hollywood Film.

 

Selected Recent Academic Publications

Books:

Holy War: Cowboys, Indians, and 9/11s (forthcoming, University of Regina Press, October 2016)

with Carmen Robertson, Seeing Red, The History of Natives in Canadian
                Newspapers.
Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press, 2011

Cowboy Imperialism and Hollywood Film. New York: Peter Lang, 2007.

Articles and book chapters:

“Intercultural Communication, the American Frontier Myth, and Several 9-11s.” In Clara
            Sarmento, ed.,  From Here to Diversity: Globalization and Intercultural
            Dialogues (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010) 74-85.

“The U.S. Frontier Myth, American Identity and 9/11” Journal of Psychohistory
            (Spring, 2011) 314-327.  

“Dark Mirror and the Golden Rule: Aboriginals in the Klondike Press.” In Raja
            Sekhar Pattati, ed., Fourthworld Literature (New Delhi, 2011) 112-135.

“The Good (for nothing!) Neighbor: Imagining Mexico.” In Juan Manuel
            Aurrecoechea, ed., La Revolución Mexicana en el espejo de la caricatura
            estadounidense (Mexico City: Museo de Carrillo Gil, 2011).

“How to Win the Vietnam War: More Rambo.” West East Journal of Social Sciences 2:
            2 (August 2013) 1-22.

“Waking Dream Talk: Cowboys, Indians, and Ronald Reagan Versus the Sandinistas.”
            Proceedings of the Cultural History Conference, Mimar Sinan Fine Arts
            University, Istanbul, Turkey, October 23-25, 2013.

 “Generational Theory and Colonialism in North America.” Journal of Psychohistory
           
(Summer, 2014)  

“ Zombies and Cowboys: How to Win the Apocalypse.” European Scientific Journal
            (ESJ),  September, 2014, Special Edition (http://eujournal.org/index.php/
            esj/issue/view/146)

 “Holy War.” In the Proceedings of the 5th International SELICUP Conference, 2015

“Imperial Cleansing, Or How the Press Rebirthed the United States in its War with
            Mexico, 1846-1848.” In Eduardo de Gregorio-Godeo María del Mar Ramón-
            Torrijos, eds., Multidisciplinary Views on Popular Culture (Newcastle upon
            Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press, in press)

“ ‘This garbage,’ Depictions of Idle No More in the Globe and Mail and National Post.”
            In David McNab and Ute Lischke, eds. Tecumseh's Vision: Indigenous Borders
            after the War of 1812
(Winnipeg: Aboriginal Issues Press, University of
            Manitoba, in press)

 

Selected Recent Conference Papers

“Colonial Fraternal Newspaper Twins, Separated at Birth: Pancho Villa and Louis Riel.” Paper presented at the Representation Now Conference, St. Louis University, Madrid, April 17, 2010

“American Identity, the Frontier Myth, and September 11.” Paper presented at the14th International Culture & Power Conference: “Identity and Identification,” University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real, Spain, April 23, 2010

“Teaching the Mexican Revolution.” Presentation at the Center for History Teaching and Learning at the University of Texas at El Paso, June 26, 2010

“Black and White and Read All Over.” Presentation at the Centre for Canadian Studies, University of Edinburgh, November 11, 2010

“The Neverending Story, How Hollywood Promotes Imperialism.” Paper delivered at the Sixth International Conference on the Arts in Society, Berlin, Germany, May 11, 2011

“The Other Twin Towers: America's Frontier Myth and Onanism.” Paper delivered at the twenty-first annual British and American Studies Conference, Timisoara, Romania, May 19, 2011

“Social Learning and the Colonized Image.” Paper delivered at the “New Trends in Global Education Conference,” North Cyprus, November 23-25, 2011

“Birth Order, Creation Stories, and the Press: Imagining Natives in Canada and the United States.” Paper delivered at the International Journal of Arts and Science annual conference, University of Malta, Gozo, Malta, February 19-23, 2012

“And Ever Shall Be: America's Frontier Wars, an Introduction.” Presentation to the Department of History Colloquium, University of Regina, October 19, 2012

“Revenge of the Virgin, or How Popular Culture Rebirthed the United States in its War with Mexico, 1846-1848.” Paper delivered at the fifth annual Congreso Internacional, "Multidisciplinary Views on Popular Culture," at the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Toledo campus, October 26, 2012

“America’s Mythical Frontier War in Central America.” Paper presented at the “WEI (West-East Institute) International Eurasian Academic Conference, Antalya, Turkey, January 14-16, 2013

Invited presentation, “Re(a)d All Over. How the Mass Media Has Imagined Natives in Canada,” Canadian Studies Centre, University of Marburg, Marburg, March 13, 2013

“Waking Dream Talk: Cowboys, Indians, and Ronald Reagan Versus the Sandinistas.”

Paper delivered at the Cultural History Conference, Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University, in Istanbul, Turkey, October 23-25, 2013

“Zombies and Cowboys: How to Win the Apocalypse.” Paper presented at the Second Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference, AIIC, University of the Azores, Ponta Delgada, Azores Islands, Portugal, July 8-12, 2014

“Why America Fights: Indians Made Me Do It.” Paper presented at the Macrotheme Social Science Research Conference, Espace Vocation Paris Haussman, Paris, December 19-20, 2014

“Creation Stories, Ethnic Cleansing, and Imaginary Indians: A Guide to Nation Building in Canada and the United States.” Invited presentation at the Centre for Intercultural Studies in Porto, Portugal, February 10-11, 2015