Jed LaCoste

Did You Know?

  •  Every single degree program at Luther College offers an optional experiential learning component; gain real world experience and get paid while you go to school!

  • Small classes = big advantages. As a federated college, Luther College classes are typically smaller. This allows for students to connect with their profs and classmates.

  • Luther College opened the first residence on campus in 1971, and is still a “home away from home” to students: meals, laundry, and lifelong friendship included.

  • Luther College at the University of Regina participates in Admission on the Spot events - campus tours, reduced application fees, and the relief of finding out you're accepted to your program right away!

  • Luther grads attend a special graduation ceremony and luncheon celebration at Luther College as well as the U of R convocation ceremony

  • The Luther College Residence hosts multiple social events and programs throughout the year, such as Christmas Dinner, International Night, Mardi Gras, and Karaoke Night.

  • It pays to go to Luther College. Literally. Luther students are eligible for an additional $100,000 in scholarships, in addition to all of the awards available to them as U of R!

  • Luther College students pay the same tuition and fees as other University of Regina students.

Jed LaCoste

Jed LaCoste
LC 304
306.206.2098
jed.lacoste@uregina.ca


James Emile Douglas (J.E.D.) LaCoste is a Lecturer in English at Luther College at the University of Regina. Born and raised in Regina, JED earned undergraduate degrees in English and Classics from the University of Saskatchewan and pursued graduate studies at both Dalhousie University and Western University before returning to Regina to lecture for Luther College.

JED's research and teaching focus on connections between fiction, narrative theory, and ethics, focusing on literary techniques that position readers as ethically responsible subjects and that ask readers to face and accept responsibility. The central idea behind his research, and a cornerstone of his approach to literature in the classroom, is that literature can encourage readers to act ethically and responsibly in their own lives if and when readers face these texts in an active, engaged, and ethically responsible way. These ideas are closely connected with the principles of effective, efficient, and direct expression and honest, objective argumentation, skills that JED enthusiastically introduces and develops in the first-year courses he teaches. While his primary research area is American Literature, JED is also interested in fantasy literature, popular culture, and literary theory. He has presented academic papers on these and a variety of other topics over the last decade.

 

Courses Taught

ENLG 100 - Critical Reading and Writing I
ENGL 110 - Critical Reading and Writing II: The Road to Middle-Earth
ENGL 110 - Critical Reading and Writing II: Race, Gender, and Justice in the American Novel

 

Current Research and Community Work

JED's academic and community activities overlap in many ways. His current research and community efforts focus on issues involving social justice and education, particularly for aboriginal people, new immigrants, and refugees. He is also very interested in the increasingly important topic of autism in the English classroom.